Mexican troops capture a top suspect in slayings of 49 via CNN

The  CNN International report on the arrest of Daniel de Jesús
Elizondo Ramírez, El Loco, the Zeta chief accused of the murder and
decapitations of the 49 people whose bodies were dumped in Nuevo Leon last
week… But first is an article from El Universal that is in El Diario.
I’ve translated a portion of the article here… This is pretty clearly all
from the SEDENA press release and note that the dates do not make any
sense… It appears to be quite a sloppy job of what the military usually
does: launch an operation in an area; kill a lot of people; then make a
high-profile arrest to blame it on the “Zeta of the day…” Note that there
were Mexican reports from the day after the bodies were found of the
banners posted all over the country, supposedly from the Zetas, saying that
they had nothing to do with the killings.

molly

Daniel de Jesús Elizondo Ramírez, El Loco, was operating for more than a
year as head of the Zetas criminal group in Cadereyta zone.
Official reports from the 7th Military Zone also indicate that “El Loco”
was responsible for the murder and dismemberment of Kendy Cavazos Caballero
and Katia Cavazos Castillo, both 24 and relatives of Aurora Cavazos,
Secretary of Social Development in Nuevo Leon.
The young women were arrested at the end of Sept 2011 for “causing a
scandal in public” and taken to the prison in Allende, a municipality
located some 60 kms south of the state capital in Monterrey.
While they were detained, they communicated via telephone with a lieutenant
in the Army who was the boyfriend of one of them.
Police who were working for Elizondo (the Zeta just arrested and charged
with the murders of the 49) reported the incident to the boss who then
ordered them to turn over the women to him.
On August 1 (no year provided…but note that the girls were supposedly
first arrested at the end of Sept 2011 and there has been no August 1 so
far this year) Kendy and Katia Cavazos were found in 3 boxes abandoned
alongside the Cadereyta-Allende highway, together with a message addressed
to the military.
Due to this murder, the Army deployed an operation in the town and in the
last 2 years, they have registered at least 20 kidnappings of businessmen
and cattle ranchers, and despite the fact that in some cases ransom was
paid, the victims were not returned alive.
On August 3 (again, no year) Army troops and state police agents detained
14 police from Allende accused of working with organized crime.
Seven of them participated in turning over the young women to “El Loco.”

Two Mexican generals detained for alleged drug gang ties–Reuters; more…

Note this from the Mexican article that is not included in the Reuters
piece:
___________
Information from investigations carried out by DEA inside the US revealed
that some Mexican army and marines have been collaborating with the Zetas
and the Gulf, Sinaloa and Juarez cartels. The US officer, who asked that
his name and agency not be revealed because he was not authorized to make
statements to the press, said that the premise had always been maintained
that military officers were innocent until proven guilty and in some cases,
they will be seeking extradition to the United States so that they can
collaborate with justice in the US.
Information from the US anti-drug agency indicates that, after a year and a
half of operations in US territory, arrests have been made that have led to
the capture of members of the Zetas, as well as those of La Familia
Michoacana, and the Gulf and Sinaloa cartels inside US territory.

Juarez transformed? Or violence displaced to other areas?

List member Jim Creechan sent me his comment and the article below yesterday. He also posted his comment on the THE CRIME REPORT website.

Posted by James Creechan
Thursday, March 01, 2012 01:31

There is another reason that the crime rate dropped in Ciudad Juarez. Basically, Juarez was a contested plaza for at least 3 cartel factions that relied on shifting alliances with street level thugs and killers. One of the cartels has managed to achieve a temporary dominance of the plaza and this led to the withdrawal and displacement of another: it seems as if the Sinaloa cartel has established its dominance, and Los Zetas have moved elsewhere to the east and central corridors (primarily into the States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas). The “pacification” of Juarez is just as likely (or more likely) the result of a “turf-war” victory by the Sinaloa cartel. The “victory” in the streets has allowed the Sinaloa cartel to reallocate its hitmen (la nueva generacion) to be used on other battlefronts in Mexico (primarily to Acapulco and Guerrero, and probably to Guadalajara). Although COMSTAT may be tracking those dips, it can hardly be seen to have caused the drop. Unfortunately, there is an element of hubris in this article when it makes the claim that strategies used in New York were responsible for the violence drop. The drug violence in Mexico is a national phenomenon, and the turf wars are not limited to one city. The violence has simply moved elsewhere. Those who are interested in knowing what is happening and what is going on are advised to look at the bigger picture more accurately tracked by sites such as Walter McKay’s https://sites.google.com/site/policereform/ For those who read Spanish, NEXOS magazine (Feb. 2012) has an article analyzing the trends and shifts in homicide rates that are much more complete than this report. It’s by Eduardo Guerrero Gutierrez (http://www.nexos.com.mx/?P=leerarticulo&Article=2102543) and even if you don’t read Spanish you can make out the homicide data in his graphs and charts.

Inside Criminal Justice

By Joseph J. Kolb

STRATFOR: Meth in Mexico: A Turning Point in the Drug War?

Mexican authorities announced Feb. 8 the largest seizure of methamphetamine in Mexican history — and possibly the largest ever anywhere — on a ranch outside of Guadalajara. The total haul was 15 tons of pure methamphetamine along with a laboratory capable of producing all the methamphetamine seized. While authorities are not linking the methamphetamine to any specific criminal group, Guadalajara is a known stronghold of the Sinaloa Federation, and previous seizures there have been connected to the group.

Methamphetamine, a synthetic drug manufactured in personal labs for decades, is nothing new in Mexico or the United States. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has led numerous crusades against the drug, increasing regulations on its ingredients to try to keep it from gaining a foothold in the United States. While the DEA’s efforts have succeeded in limiting production of the drug in the United States, consumption has risen steadily over the past two decades. The increasing DEA pressure on U.S. suppliers and the growing demand for methamphetamine have driven large-scale production of the drug outside the borders of the United States. Given Mexico’s proximity and the pervasiveness of organized criminal elements seeking new markets, it makes sense that methamphetamine would be produced on an industrial scale there. Indeed, Mexico has provided an environment for a scale of production far greater than anything ever seen in the United States.

Stratfor MYTH debunked by Mexican reporters…

Check out the translation of this article in Hilo Directo by José Pérez Espino, commenting on a report in LETRAS LIBRES by Juan Carlos Romero
Puga. Both Mexican journalists note that the portrayal of the ZETAS that appears over and over again in US media and reports from “intelligence analysts” like STRATFOR (and I would add by US government agencies also) are simply repeating the Mexican government’s own pronouncements that have little basis on the ground in Mexico… Here’s the quote from Perez Espino:

“The security consultants Statfor practically reproduced the official
version and assumed that the Zetas are a drug trafficking cartel, and
the most powerful criminal group in the country.”

Thanks to UPSIDEDOWN WORLD for the translation and to Dawn Paley for
sending to the list. Below the translation are the original articles
from Hilo Directo and Letras Libres. molly

Stratfor’s Myth in Mexico
Written by José Pérez-Espino, Translation by Laura Cann
Wednesday, 15 February 2012 18:37

Editor’s note: We republish the translation of this blog entry to
share with our readers an important, critical perspective on Austin,
Texas based “intelligence” firm Stratfor, whose reports are often
cited and repeated without question in the U.S. media.

Source: hilo directo

Original en español:

El mito de Stratfor
José Pérez-Espino
Periodista. Es autor del ensayo Homicidios de mujeres: la invención de
mitos…