Follow-up on murder of Eligio Ibarra

The man who was killed and burned inside of his house on Thursday night
last week was identified as Eligio Ibarra. In 2011, he was kidnapped and
extorted by a group of federal policemen and he managed to escape and turn
them in to the investigators of the Federal Attorney General. Those police
are said to be in jail. Mr. Ibarra fled the city for his safety and he was
reported to have returned last week in order to testify against the
kidnappers today. The first article includes a statement from human rights
ombudsman, Gustavo de la Rosa, about the chilling effect on other victims
and witnesses to crimes and abuses by government authorities. Late this
afternoon, the state attorney general of Chihuahua issued a statement that
the motive for the murder of Mr. Ibarra may have been robbery…and what’s
more, Mr. Ibarra may have been murdered by someone he knew and that he had eaten dinner with that person on the night of the crime… No, I cannot
make this stuff up. And I am sure there will be more details on an arrest
of this accused killer tomorrow in the paper.

It is worth considering these multiple crimes and the possible motives and
suspects in the murder of Mr. Ibarra. It is also worthwhile to consider the
gang of federal police officers caught in the act of kidnapping and
extortion and compare this reality in the city of Juarez with the
statements of the former DEA head Robert Bonner in his NYTimes oped last
Sunday… He credits the “new” federal police force established under
Calderon as the knights in shining armor in the “drug war.”
-Molly

A empresario lo mató un conocido para robarlo: Fiscalía

STRATFOR: Meth in Mexico: A Turning Point in the Drug War?

Mexican authorities announced Feb. 8 the largest seizure of methamphetamine in Mexican history — and possibly the largest ever anywhere — on a ranch outside of Guadalajara. The total haul was 15 tons of pure methamphetamine along with a laboratory capable of producing all the methamphetamine seized. While authorities are not linking the methamphetamine to any specific criminal group, Guadalajara is a known stronghold of the Sinaloa Federation, and previous seizures there have been connected to the group.

Methamphetamine, a synthetic drug manufactured in personal labs for decades, is nothing new in Mexico or the United States. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has led numerous crusades against the drug, increasing regulations on its ingredients to try to keep it from gaining a foothold in the United States. While the DEA’s efforts have succeeded in limiting production of the drug in the United States, consumption has risen steadily over the past two decades. The increasing DEA pressure on U.S. suppliers and the growing demand for methamphetamine have driven large-scale production of the drug outside the borders of the United States. Given Mexico’s proximity and the pervasiveness of organized criminal elements seeking new markets, it makes sense that methamphetamine would be produced on an industrial scale there. Indeed, Mexico has provided an environment for a scale of production far greater than anything ever seen in the United States.

Houston Chronicle story on use of informants

HOUSTON  To cops and the courts, they are confidential informants and cooperating co-conspirators. In the streets, they are snitches and rats.

They make deals to avoid prosecution or do less time, sometimes paid with tax dollars to burrow in where undercover officers cannot. But once deals are made with authorities, what may seem like a stroke of luck can become a life imperiled.

Countless criminals, lovers, brothers and friends havegone down in part on the word of an informant or government witness, a high-stakes turn-of-play that fuels distrust and sometimes leads to death.

Authorities do not track how many informants are working for local, state and federal officers; nor are there standard guidelines for how they are used or protected.

But their secretive roles in law enforcement increasingly are being made public in Texas and elsewhere as the collateral damage plays out in killings, arrests and attacks.

Click here to read more