Visit to the Nogales, AZ U.S. B.P. Detention Area for Migrant Children…Kino Border Initiative

This report was sent from Father Sean Carroll of the Kino Border Initiative, located in Nogales. It is reposted here with permission. The listero who sent it my way said that Father Sean is contacting many clergy and media with this message.

Visit to the Nogales, AZ U.S. Border Patrol Station’s

Detention Area for Migrant Children

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Sean Carroll, S.J.

 

On Wednesday, June 11, 2014, I accompanied a group of representatives from the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office, Congressman Raúl Grijalva’s Office, Senator Dianne Feinstein’s Office and the Santa Cruz Count Board of Supervisors.

We were first briefed by Mr. George Allen, a representative of the U.S. Border Patrol.  He made the following points:

·         The Office of Refugee Resettlement has been overwhelmed by the number of migrant children crossing into South Texas from Mexico, and has not had adequate space to receive and process so many young people.

·         The decision was made to transport children by plane to Tucson International Airport and then taken by bus to the U.S. Border Patrol Station in Nogales, AZ.

·         Food is being provided three times a day with snacks in between.  A dining hall has been set up where the children can eat.

·         The children range in age from three to seventeen.

·         They can offer showers to sixty children at one time.

·         A play area is being set up in the parking lot for the children.

·         Public health services are available, which include a health screening, vaccinations and blood tests.

·         The plan is to have the children for seventy-two hours and then be transferred to another facility.  If they are over twelve, it will be to a military base.  If they are under twelve, it will be to a facility run by the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

·         The consuls from the respective countries have access.  Most of the children are from Honduras and El Salvador.

·         At the moment, they have 1,100 children.  Seventy-eight children were transferred yesterday.

·         The children currently sleep on plastic cots, but 2,000 correctional mattresses have been ordered and will be delivered today or tomorrow.

·         140 Border Patrol Agents have come to assist.

During the question and answer period, he made these additional points in response to questions:

·         The United States Public Health Service is available to provide counseling to the children.

·         Customs and Border Protection Chaplains are coming to accompany the children.  They do not appear to want pastoral assistance from the local Nogales community.

·         Televisions are being set up, which will be used to show the “What to Expect” video and to explain their rights.  They will be able to use the televisions for recreational purposes as well.

·         No plan exists at the moment to engage the local community in providing assistance to the children, though we were told that the plan would be forthcoming.  It is likely that the Red Cross will play a role.

We then walked over to the area where the children are staying.  It is a very large warehouse building and part of it is used for the children.  In the parking lot, two tents have been set up where the play/recreational area will be located.

One large truck was outside the warehouse, which was being used to wash clothing.  At least one truck was there containing showers and there were two trucks with toilets and sinks (we could not go inside to see for ourselves).  However, sometime after we entered the warehouse, a group of young girls were escorted in from outside, and it was clear that they had bathed.

The inside of the warehouse had an adequately cool temperature.  To the left as we entered was the area that had been set up for vaccinations and other health services.  There were a line of refrigerators and freezers, presumably for vaccines and other supplies.  An area nearby had also been designated to keep the children’s belongings in large plastic bags.  Also, a number of phones were visible and were being used.  They were available so the children can speak to consular officials and to their families.

We arrived at lunchtime, so groups of 200 children at a time walked in a single line to receive their food and then to eat in the designated area.  Physically, most looked like they were in good condition, adequately clothed and were having their basic needs met.  At the same time, we were not allowed to speak with them, so it was difficult to assess how they were doing psychologically and spiritually.

The next step is to keep communicating with FEMA (the Federal Emergency Management Agency) to develop and implement a plan that clarifies the children’s needs and provides people the opportunity to respond to them.  Once we have some direction, then we will make that information available on our web site and on our Facebook page.  We will send out an e-mail blast as well.

I know this report does not answer all the questions, but hopefully it gives a clearer sense of the overall condition of the children and of the place where they are staying at the moment.

Thanks so much for all your generous offers of support.  We are so grateful.

Unaccompanied Immigrant Children Report Serious Abuse by U.S. Officials During Detention…ACLU

The cases detailed in this ACLU complaint predate the current wave of child migrants and their detention. So far, there has been little access to the hundreds of minors now being detained in Nogales, Arizona and at other facilities in Texas and California.

Below are a series of articles from the local newspaper in Nogales. I took a few photos outside of the Border Patrol station on Tuesday, though it is not easy to see enough to know exactly which building is where the children are being held. But, for those not familiar with Nogales, it will give at least an idea what the facility and surroundings look like. Photos at the link below. -Molly

https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/101512747186306511699/albums/6023777000120646465

 

Southside Presbyterian Revives Sanctuary Movement…Daily Beast

What is most interesting in this article is the clear description of how quality legal representation makes such a difference in immigration cases. Unfortunately, most people in the system get little or none, or they pay many thousands of dollars to lawyers and get deported anyway because the cases are so difficult.

Also of interest is the description of detention conditions–the cold holding tanks, loud music, harassment by guards… techniques designed to make the detainees give up. -Molly

This Church Is Reviving the Sanctuary Movement to Shelter Undocumented Immigrants From Deportation

As the immigration debate gets even more politicized, one church on the Arizona border is quietly taking up a long-held tradition of offering safe haven for families facing deportation.

Daniel Neyoy Ruiz doesn’t sleep much. He lies awake on the bunk bed he shares with his wife and 13-year-old son, wondering what he will do if he’s forced to leave them. Every police siren sends his stomach into knots: Is this it? Are they coming for me?…

Report From Nogales

Below is an update on some efforts in the southern Arizona religious/humanitarian community to gain access to the Nogales Border Patrol facility to provide aid to the children there. Below that is a CNN report that seems pretty “fair and balanced.”
Attached is a letter to the White House from Arizona Congressman Raul Grijalva.

I visited the site of the warehousing of the children in Nogales today… There were some media there hoping for a photo or a press conference, but no one is being allowed in. What I was able to see is essentially the same as the report from CNN. A gate, a lot of trucks going in an out, a large warehouse-type facility within the perimeter of the Border Patrol station. I did not see any “FEMA trailers left over from Katrina” anywhere and suspect that is a right-wing rumor based on the hysterical reporting from the sites mentioned below… I’ve seen lots of those trailers dumped on roadsides in Louisiana. I seriously doubt that any of them would be worth moving to Arizona. There is a lot of warehouse space in Nogales, Arizona, so I imagine if the government needs more, they could find it. Making it liveable for the people being housed there might take some time. And for what it’s worth, to the best of my knowledge, unaccompanied minors have never been quickly deported from the US. The law requires that they be treated as refugees, that they be reunited with parents if parents can be located. The large numbers of people coming now will take some time to process.

And, the right-wing media (Townhall and Breitbart and FOX) now report that some border patrol officers have been fired or threatened with firing for releasing pictures from inside the Texas detention facilities to the media… See:

http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2014/06/06/exclusive-illegal-children-sleeping-in-cages-as-arizona-border-patrol-resources-continue-to-be-overwhelmed-n1848469

http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2014/06/09/nogales-border-patrol-station-cracks-down-on-agents-threatens-firings-over-leaked-unaccompanied-children-photos-n1849201?utm_source=TopBreakingNewsCarousel&utm_medium=story&utm_campaign=BreakingNewsCarousel

AND FOX: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2014/06/09/leaked-photos-show-undocumented-immigrants-held-in-alarming-conditions/

_____________
Molly—thanks for this article. The media coverage about the children being housed in Nogales is confusing and sometimes confounding. The facts as I know it:

1) Fr. Sean Carroll, executive director of Kino Border Initiative, a key organization in humanitarian efforts at the border, was refused access to the warehouse facility in Nogales, AZ. on Thursday, Friday, and throughout the weekend. He contacted Border Patrol officials, FEMA, and others about what KBI and other humanitarian groups can do to alleviate the situation. No response.
2) Today, Monday, he made contact with Rev. David Meyers of FEMA and a conference call has been set up for Tuesday, June 10, to set up a protocol for providing aid to the children.
3) Journalists have not been allowed into the building (a warehouse), but have seen children from ages 1-18 coming out of the compound after meals. Older children have younger toddlers and a few infants in tow.
4) The Samaritans and other groups are gathering clothes, toys, games, for the kids.
5) The State agencies are being told that this is a federal matter, and so they are also not being allowed into the warehouse to see what is going on. Exception: a few State legislators did see where the children eat, but not where they sleep. One said it is a “sad situation.” FEMA, HHS and Homeland Security are the chief players in this drama.
6) I will be in Nogales, Sonora, tomorrow working at el comedor, the shelter for recently deported migrants. I plan to drive over to the warehouse in Arizona and see for myself what is going on. Of course, I don’t expect to be allowed in, but I want to check it out.
7) June 10 there will be the monthly vigil for Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez, the 17 year old that was shot and killed by Border Patrol in 2012. A lot of Americans will be there to memorialize this young man as well as protest present US immigration policies.
8) No one seems to know what the plan is for these children. There are attempts to reunite them with families here in the US and back in their home country. The general consensus is that this situation is not going to go away. More children and women will be arriving in large numbers.

__________________________________

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/08/us/arizona-dhs-undocumented-children-moved/

Refugees Coming To El Paso, More To Arizona…

June 7: Below are several more reports on the current numbers of Central American refugees entering the US. Though the AP story from last night (second in list below) says that people will continue to be sent to Arizona, ICE officials as well as some workers with the Catholic diocese refugee services and others in the religious communities serving immigrants in El Paso have said that buses and planes will begin bringing some of these people to El Paso starting today…

As for the reasons these folks are coming in such numbers, I believe that we cannot discount fact that people talk to each other along the route and these communications (true and otherwise) have some influence on the decisions people make. As far as the dangers they face traveling through Mexico, there is ample evidence that many migrants are killed or go missing along the way. There is no safe route (other than in a commercial flight which poor people cannot afford) across Mexico for these people, yet we know that in recent years more and more have attempted the journey despite the dangers.

There have been other large-scale movements of people from Central America into the US in past years…the kinds of movements that make it difficult or impossible for ICE to detain them all and so they will be released on condition that they report to immigration later.  Hurricane Mitch in 1998 for example caused large numbers of people to leave the region and many were given temporary protected status in the US:

http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=ee5a15c67fb5ca48d49d489f0b0d375c

People are now fleeing war-like conditions caused by criminal activities in the region and the government malfeasance. Poverty is at the root of why most people migrate and that is true in the current situation as well. molly

http://www.elpasotimes.com/news/ci_25916964/el-paso-may-see-an-influx-undocumented-immigrants

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/us-agency-flying-migrant-families-arizona-24036894?singlePage=true

UPDATE (June 8): There is a lot of in-depth information in the report from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops trip to Central America in Nov 2013. This report was cited in a previous posting. I note that it does have links to some statistics from US authorities on the numbers of unaccompanied children apprehended in previous years. It is available here:

http://www.usccb.org/about/migration-policy/upload/Mission-To-Central-America-FINAL-2.pdf

http://www.elpasotimes.com/news/ci_25921825/planes-carrying-130-people-land-el-paso

UPDATE (June 8): Apparently, there are at least 270–not 130–immigrants who have been flown to El Paso from the Rio Grande Valley. The situation is changing rapidly and according to a media person who wrote to me personally, the CBP officials are not giving many statements to reporters, but there should be updates tomorrow.

The Annunciation House press conference on the local faith community response will be Monday at 1:30 pm at CASA VIDES, 325 Leon Street in El Paso. molly

2,600 Disappeared Since Mexico’s Peña Nieto Took Office…Pan American Post

There have been some interesting disagreements (for lack of a better word) in the Mexican press recently concerning the numbers of disappeared people in the country… A nice summary in english by Pan American Post…

Some of the links in the Pan American Post:

http://www.animalpolitico.com/2014/05/solo-se-ha-localizado-73-victimas-de-desaparicion-forzada-pgr/#axzz331YaeeZX

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/mexico-recalculates-number-of-missing-to-8000/2014/05/23/f916de58-e2af-11e3-9442-54189bf1a809_story.html

https://readymag.com/animalpolitico/31859/5/

https://readymag.com/animalpolitico/31859/

http://www.thepanamericanpost.com/2014/06/2600-disappeared-since-mexicos-pena.html

Q & A with author Todd Miller

Todd Miller is  a Tucson-based freelance journalist who has covered the U.S.- Mexico border for the last 15 years for publications including The Nation, NACLA Report on the Americas, and Mother Jones. His first book, Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Homeland Security explores border security post 9/11 and examines what he calls the “new world border.”  To learn more, visit his website.

**********************************************************************************************************************

You’ve been reporting about the border for several years now, what made you decide to focus on border patrol and what surprised you the most in your findings?

One of the first acts of journalism that I did was photograph a crew from the U.S. Army corps of engineers when they were building the wall between Douglas and Agua Prieta in the late 1990s. That was when Border Patrol was concentrating agents and technology, and building walls in the urban areas along the 2,000 mile U.S. Mexico border. Then in 2001 I was working for a binational organization in Tucson, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora when 9/11 hit. With this, I witnessed first hand the advent of the homeland security era of the Border Patrol. The results of this have been nothing less than startling.

For Border Patrol Nation, I interviewed public information officers in places like Puerto Rico, El Paso, Tucson, and Detroit. However, I also interviewed many individual agents who had a wide range of perspectives. I interviewed from the most gung-ho to those with serious critiques about the agency. I met their kids, and went to their homes. I found that most agents think that they are in an insular world, and nobody really understands what they do. Many feel they are criticized by all sides of the political spectrum. I felt like when I was able to humanize the agent, I was able to see that they were only a small part— though a powerful part—of a much bigger world. Border Patrolling has become an industry, a technological innovation, a problem to be “solved” by engineers. There are many, many people of all perspectives involved with this domestic national security monolith, of which Border Patrol by virtue of its uniformed presence is its most public face. That was one surprise. The other surprise was when this world revealed itself, I saw that it was much bigger, and had penetrated the country (and more and more the world) in more startling and powerful ways than I was even aware of. To find these angles became, in a sense, one of the prime missions of the book.

Could you explain what you mean by the “new world border”?

This term comes from a chapter where I spend quite a bit of time on the Dominican Haiti international boundary. There, before my eyes, was a rustic version of the U.S.-Mexico border. Along the Massacre River, which demarcates the divide between the two countries that share the same island, were protest barricades placed crookedly and serving as a rudimentary barricade. Behind the barricades the Dominican Border Patrol, known as CESFRONT, sat their Xs, watching their sections of border like agents in the United States. When I asked these Dominican agents if they had received training from the U.S. Border Patrol they said yes. Not only has there been training, but also the United States sent resources. In fact, the whole idea that the Dominican Republic needed its own border patrol came from a U.S. report issued in 2006. Turns out, the United States, and its Border Patrol, has done trainings across the globe in more than 100 different countries. And it further turns out that the global market for border security is in an “unprecedented growth period,” hundreds of billions of dollars potentially. From Asia to Africa, from the Middle East to southern Europe, from Brazil to Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala, hardened enforced boundaries are becoming the norm, particularly between the global south (and its different gradations—the Dominicans can police the Haitians, but the Dominicans need to be policed by the United States) with the global north. As former Customs and Border Protection chief David Aguilar said, Border Patrol’s work in the “hemisphere” is to protect “our way of life.”

You say that since 9/11,  Border Patrol has more than doubled its ranks, has roughly 21,000 agents nationwide and continues to expand. What do you see as the outcome of this growth and expansion?

At a recent community meeting on the Tohono O’odham Nation in southern Arizona the speaker—who was looking into Homeland Security abuse on the Nation–asked a group of approximately 100 O’odham seated there how many had been pulled over by the U.S. Border Patrol. For those that don’t know, the Tohono O’odham reservation shares a 70 mile border with Mexico, but their aboriginal land extend hundreds of miles into Mexico. When the borderline was drawn through its territory in 1853, the O’odham were not consulted. Yet, for years, and up until around 9/11 the O’odham simply ignored the boundary line, crossing back and forth to visit family, go to school, go to work, go to cultural and ceremonial sites. Up until the 1990s there was almost no Border Patrol presence (the agency began in 1924).

Now, at that community meeting, every single person raised their hand. Every single person had been pulled over, at least once, by Border Patrol. The degree of the shift of the Homeland Security presence on the Tohono O’odham Nation is a perfect reflection of Border Patrol growth. If you were to go to the O’odham reservation right now, you might see more green-striped Border Patrol vehicles, than normal ones. There are ATV and horse patrols. There are surveillance towers and surveillance drones overhead. There are Blackhawk helicopters and military style Forward Operating Bases.

People on the rez are complaining of tailgating, of Border Patrol spotlighting into their vehicles at night. People talk of interrogations, being pulled out of their cars, of being pepper sprayed. On all paved roads leading out of the reservation there are checkpoints: Heading west towards Phoenix in Gila Bend, Heading north to Casa Grand, Heading east to Tucson. If you speak the Tohono O’odham language to the agents, like Tohono O’odham member Ofelia Rivas, expect secondary and your car to be searched. You will be detained. This is one of the sharpest examples—but only one example of many– of the giant Homeland Security complex spreading across the country into many places—including places where it had very little presence before such as Rochester, New York or Erie, Pennsylvania. Since this type of expansion is basically unquestioned, unless more people step up and challenge it, we can only expect more of the same.

Could you talk more about the Border Patrol youth programs?

In every city and town on the southern U.S. border, and increasingly in the north are programs that the U.S. Border Patrol has with youth. One of these is called the Explorer program, which comes from the Boy Scouts of America. With the Border Patrol, teenagers learn handcuffing techniques and with “red guns” (fake guns) take down potential terrorists and other threats. They learn how to do interrogations (or “field interviews” as Border Patrol calls them) and to question people about their documents. When I met with the Explorer post in El Paso at dawn, they were doing uniform inspections, and then marched in lock step around the Border Patrol Training Center. The kids learn what it takes to become an agent. And, as many agents have pointed out, Border Patrol can identify possible recruits for an agency that is always expanding and always on the lookout for more agents.

But there is more to the creating of the fertile ground upon which the homeland security state can grow. As one of the agents working with the kids told me—it’s more than recruiting. He told me about the Thanksgiving parade in El Paso. He said that when the Border Patrol marched at that parade, they would get a mixed reaction at best. But, he said, a couple years ago the youth Explorer post began to march right along with them. The applause from the crowd was wild. The families, cousins, aunts, uncles, and friends of the kids were all in the audience. The kids, this agent told me, were “the key” to Border Patrol’s relationship with the community.

You write, “Predawn house raids have become a routine tactic for ICE, it’s a time when most people are at their most vulnerable: at home and unconscious.” Why do you think the Homeland Security agents have been using such tactics?

The predawn raid is a military tactic to get to somebody when they are at their most defenseless. The Cardozo Immigration Justice Clinic documents cases of ICE agents storming into people’s homes– in one occasion pulling the covers off of a sleeping woman, shining a bright flashlight into her face and her child’s face who began to wail in terror. In another incident, in Massachusetts, ICE agents kicked in the front door of a house, leaving splintered wooden fragments on the floor. Like in a war, they commanded every one to lie down and stay still. They shined bright lights directly into people’s faces. These tactics, and others– such as Border Patrol agents shooting into and killing people in Mexico—give credence to the idea that Homeland Security is acting in some sort of war posture, even in their domestic operations. The priority mission of Customs and Border Protection, for example, in the post 9/11 era is to stop “terrorists” and “weapons of mass destruction” from penetrating our borders. They are on the front lines, the rhetoric goes. They have lots of weaponry and high-powered and sophisticated surveillance equipment at their disposal. They have drones flying overhead, some with radar systems imported from U.S. war efforts in Afghanistan, such as the VADER system. They have high-tech war rooms with expensive video walls for “situational awareness.” The tactics of war are very much a part of today’s Homeland Security operations. Predawn raids are just one part of that.

What would you propose as a solution?

What I know, first and foremost, that a much more holistic dialogue is needed which includes a variety of voices such as those most impacted by the Border Patrol expansion like the Tohono O’odham people mentioned above. The notion, even the term “border security” I believe needs to be challenged. It implies that this expanding security monolith is indeed protecting “us” from some sort of ill-defined “them” who are out to get us. By far the brunt of Border Patrol arrests are of people who are coming north to find a job. People who probably didn’t want to leave their communities, their loved ones, the food that they eat, and the language that they speak, but felt their hand was forced by an untenable economic situation or a situation of spiraling violence and threat—or both—speaks to the need for a much more profound analysis around the immigration debate.

The fact that the immigration reform bill (passed in the Senate a year ago) is more than 1000 pages long– and with the Hoeven-Corker amendment includes a provision for $46 billion designated to “border security”–with no mention at all about, say, the impacts of the North American Free Trade Agreement in Mexico, seems like an omission of extraordinary proportions. If U.S. economic policy– or say a set of policies such as IMF structural adjustment (in effect in Mexico since 1982)–has anything at all to do with anyone losing their livelihood and having to move or migrate in order to find work, such policies need to be scrutinized. And this needs to be a part of any immigration reform debate. In the immigration debates, and thus the immigration reform bills, this part of it is so roundly ignored that to bring it up almost seems like you are coming from left field, and at times openly disdained.

However it was former INS chief Doris Meissner who argued to Congress in 1993—indeed she was arguing for the militarized border apparatus that we see now with Operations Hold-the-Line, Gatekeeper, and Safeguard—who said “Responding to the likely short- to medium-term impacts of NAFTA will require strengthening our enforcement efforts along the border.” Before it even happened, Meissner prophesied Mexico’s post-NAFTA exodus.

Right now economic systems in the world are structured in such a way that we are seeing unprecedented inequality, few extremely rich and many, many poor. The solution lies in a wider discussion that includes unprecedented world-wide inequality as an important reason why so many people are migrating and that treats cross-border immigration as an international issue.

With the constant talk of immigration reform, how do you hope your book will inform policy makers?

Border Patrol Nation offers a contribution to an ever-evolving landscape, and I hope it indeed will inform both our policy-makers and their constituents and at least contribute to a more robust debate. The idea that the debate around “border security” is one that occurs at the fringes has to stop. The idea that money is continually thrown to this border fortifying initiative without much debate at all needs to stop. If there’s one contribution that my book makes at this level, it is at the very least that this debate needs to happen. But I also hope the book drives home the point that this debate is also important to the very direction of our country and to what we are becoming.

If people were to take just one thing from this book, what do you think that should be?

Aren’t there much more important things—such as basic services like education, housing, or public transportation—where we can put the billions designated now to Homeland Security? If there is a security crisis in the United States it is that people are losing their homes, their jobs, their transportation. It is not from a non-existent terrorist lurking on the other side of an international boundary line.

 

 

 

Immigration Rumors May Be Driving More Women, Children To Cross Border…Fronteras Desk

In this report, at least one Guatemalan immigrant reports that there is information/misinformation in that country and along the migrant trail that women and children will not be detained (at least not for long) if they are able to reach the U.S. Each case is different. In the case reported here, the mother is undocumented and she entered (or probably re-entered) the US illegally. This will probably make her deportable and she will have a difficult time avoiding that. The fact that she has US citizen children may help her case, but it does not insure that she will not be deported.

I have no doubt that immigrants or potential immigrants talk about experiences they have had or have heard of where women and children will be processed and then released and this makes them willing to take their chances at getting across the US border… Considering the conditions they face in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, the choices they make are quite logical. -molly

52 Homicides In May In Juarez; 200 Victims In 2014

May was the most violent month so far in 2014, ending with 52 homicides. Seven of the victims were women. Five children were killed including 3 apparently strangled by their father who also killed their mother, and yesterday an apparent murder-suicide in which a woman killed her 5-month old baby and herself (story also posted below) Victims also included a municipal policeman, two well-known attorneys and 4 members of the gay community.

The total homicides for 2014 now stand at 200–an average of 1.3 people per day.

January 32
February 41
March 40
April 35
May 52

Murders in Ciudad Juarez 2007-May 2014

2007 316
2008 1623
2009 2754
2010 3622
2011 2086
2012 797
2013 535
2014 200 (Jan-May)

Fue Mayo El Mes Más Violento En Lo Que Va Del Año (El Diario)

Confirma Fiscalía Que Muerte De Madre Y Bebé Fue Homicidio-Suicidio (El Diario)

Immigrants Detained In South Texas Taken To Bus Stations In Arizona…

Several stories on the current ICE tactic of transporting immigrants picked up in the Rio Grande Valley to Tucson and Phoenix, releasing them at bus stations. According to the articles, most of these immigrants have come from Central American countries.

Immigrant Surge In McAllen Crowds Bus Station In Tucson (The Brownsville Herald)

Scores Of Undocumented Migrants Dropped Off In Arizona (AZ Central)

Volunteers, Travelers Help Stranded Migrants (AZ Central)