Mexico homicides Jan-May 2018; Juarez June homicides

The SESNSP recently updated the numbers on homicide victims in Mexico, January-May 2018. Below is a screenshot of the homicide data reported and a summary of Mexican homicide data from 2007-May 2018, with links to the sources of the data.

Also today, El Diario reported that there have been 161 murders in Juarez so far in the month of June, bringing the total so far this year to about 529, an average of about 3 victims per day. There should be more detail on the victims in a few days.  molly molloy

Juarez 2018
January 76
February 45
March 58
April 65
May 124
as of June 27 161

Mexico Homicides: 2007- May 2018

Compiled by Molly Molloy

The numbers in the table below include official Mexican government homicide statistics from 2007-May 2018, using INEGI figures for 2007-2016, with data from the SESNSP for 2017-May 2018.

The data on the numbers of homicide victims for January-May 2018 show an overall steady increase, with a very slight decrease from March-April. During the first 5 months of 2018, an average of 88 people are murdered each day in Mexico.

Homicides in Mexico, 2007-March 2018

YEAR #Homicides Rate=#/100,000 population
2007* 8,867 8
2008 14,006 13
2009 19,803 18
2010 25,757 23
2011 27,213 24
2012 25,967 22
2013 23,063 19
2014 20,010 17
2015 20,525 17
2016 23,953 20
2017** 29,168 23
TOTAL 2007-2017 238,332  
     
2018***     
Jan 2,550  
Feb 2,389  
Mar 2,746  
Apr 2,723  
May 2,890  
     
SUB-TOTAL 2018 13,298  
     
CUMULATIVE 2007-May 2018 251,630  

*INEGI: http://www.inegi.org.mx/saladeprensa/boletines/2017/homicidios/homicidios2017_07.pdf

**SESNSP 2017 reports: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

***SESNSP 2018 reports: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/nueva-metodologia/CNSP-V%C3%ADctimas-2018.pdf

_____

http://diario.mx/Local/2018-06-28_d9d02459/acumula-junio-161-homicidios-violentos-/

Acumula junio 161 homicidios violentos

Staff/
El Diario de Juárez | Jueves 28 Junio 2018 | 00:01:00 hrs

El vocero de la Fiscalía Zona Norte, Alejandro Ruvalcaba informó ayer que hasta las 7:00 de la tarde habían muerto en hechos violentos 161 personas durante junio.

Dijo que a estos incidentes se suman la muerte por arma de fuego de Alfredo Benavides Ramírez, de 26 años, localizado acribillado dentro de un vehículo en la colonia Bellavista la mañana del martes.

Sobre las calles Plomo y Azucenas la policía encontró 9 casquillos percutidos de calibre 9 milímetros que corresponden a esa escena del crimen, dijo.

Germán Osvaldo González García, de 32 años de edad, perdió la vida en un hospital local a donde ingresó después de recibir varios balazos en un incidente el pasado martes, ocurrido en la calle Félix Candela de la colonia Horizontes del Sur, donde los investigadores hallaron 5 casquillos de arma larga calibre .223, según la información oficial.

También anteayer fue asesinado Manuel Rentería Pérez, de 50 años, agredido a tiros en la colonia Lomas de Zaragoza, donde sobre la calle Luciano Serra la policía tomó como evidencia seis casquillos de calibre 9 milímetros.

En el último incidente violento del martes, cuatro personas fueron asesinadas en un solo evento en las calles Manuel Altamirano y Juan José Méndez de la colonia Leyes de Reforma.

El hecho ocurrió antes de la medianoche y hasta ayer sólo fueron identificados Sergio Arturo Jasso Jasso y Daniel Humberto Espinoza Jasso, de 23 y 31 años de edad, respectivamente, como víctimas de estos hechos.

 

 

 

Tornillo “tent city”

A few comments regarding the El Paso area politicians quoted concerning the Tornillo tent city for imprisoning immigrant children. First, Republican congressman Will Hurd: 

“U.S. Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican who represents a large district that includes Tornillo, said he is “disappointed” in the lack of information the government is providing about the “detention situation along the border.” “The crisis along the border is not new and will continue until we have smart border security, work to address root causes of mass migration from Central American countries and have enough immigration judges to apply consequences for violation of the law,” Hurd said in a statement. “Our strategy to solving our broken immigration system should never include the use of children as a deterrent.”

Here is the “smart border security” Hurd is pushing in congress: 

“Last July, Hurd introduced the Secure Miles with All Resources and Technology (SMART) Act, which would direct DHS to deploy technologies for “situational awareness and operational control of the border.” His nine cosponsors include two Democrats. The bill is awaiting a vote, but some of its key ideas found their way into the 2018 federal budget, which provides funds for border-security technology.

“Nobody is disagreeing with the smart wall,” says Hurd, a former CIA agent who is one of the few members of Congress with a computer science degree. The economics are an obvious factor. “A concrete structure 30 feet high that takes four hours to penetrate costs $24.5 million a mile,” he says. “A smart wall, a system like what Anduril is proposing, is about a half a million a mile.”   https://www.wired.com/story/palmer-luckey-anduril-border-wall/

This high tech project may sound great (and cheap)… Come to think of it, tent cities in the desert are probably pretty cheap also. But consider the political and social roots of this company, Anduril, and its brains:

“The politics of Anduril’s founders may not be popular in liberal Silicon Valley, but they need to please a different audience: members of Congress and government bureaucrats. To win big border contracts, Anduril must beat out other companies peddling visions of an electronic border wall, including an Israeli firm called Elbit Systems, as well as traditional defense giants.   …

“Meanwhile, Luckey’s political activities had made him the object of tech-press scorn. News reports claimed that Luckey was involved in an alt-right group called Nimble America, paying for billboards ripping Hillary Clinton as “Too Big to Jail” and allegedly penning vicious Reddit posts for the group. On his public Facebook page, he denied many of the allegations but confirmed that he donated $10,000 to Nimble America because he “thought the organization had fresh ideas on how to communicate with young voters.” He apologized for “negatively impacting the perception of Oculus and its partners.” When asked about this now, the normally buoyant Luckey drops his smile and chooses his words carefully, claiming that his politics are misunderstood. “The alt-right, as it exists, as it’s defined, I do not support, never have,” he says. He describes himself as “fiscally conservative, pro-freedom, little-Llibertarian, and big-R Republican.”

“Lonsdale and Luckey argue that building cheaper, more efficient systems is a virtuous pursuit, saving taxpayer dollars. Anduril’s Palantir pedigree may have prepared it for criticism. As that company grew to a private valuation of $20 billion, its technology has been portrayed as Big Brother–style surveillance tools. Anduril’s leaders tread lightly on the subject of deadly force—traditionally the purview of defense companies—and have a ready answer when I ask whether the company will ever build systems that kill people.  … “We’re really focused on the intelligence and surveillance piece right now,” Schimpf says. But in the next beat: Not that there’s anything wrong with building weapons. “I wouldn’t say that’s a line we’re drawing.”” https://www.wired.com/story/palmer-luckey-anduril-border-wall/

And the democratic nominee for the El Paso congressional seat, Veronica Escobar, has been criticized in the press because her husband, Michael Pleters, is a former prosecutor for DHS and is now an immigration judge.  For those not familiar with immigration courts, the DHS attorneys challenge every immigrant’s claim to asylum and other relief from deportation. Immigrants are not entitled to have an attorney to represent them. Most cannot afford representation. Numerous studies have shown that immigrants represented in court may prevail in about 45% of cases, while those without are successful in less than 11% of cases. https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/access-counsel-immigration-court  There are not nearly enough pro bono attorneys to represent even a tiny percentage of people in immigration court. El Paso immigration judges deny more than 90% of asylum claims they hear…one of the lowest rates in any immigration court jurisdiction in the country. molly molloy

 

“Veronica Escobar, the Democratic nominee in the race to replace O’Rourke in Congress, said lawmakers need to take action to stop the practice of separating families and therefore lessen the need for temporary shelters in the first place.  “The family separation occurring in our country is a tragedy of historic proportions, and it’s heartbreaking to know it’s occurring in our own backyard,” Escobar, a former county judge, said in a statement. “This policy, cruelty that was created by the Trump administration, is policy that the President can end, and one that Congress must end if he does not.” https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/immigration/2018/06/14/trump-administration-picks-tornillo-tent-site-immigrant-kids/703455002/

“Her husband deports immigrants for the Trump administration. He was appointed in June last year by Jeff Sessions,” Fenenbock said. Pleters was appointed by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to begin hearing immigration cases in July. Escobar said her husband applied for the position during President Barack Obama’s administration.” https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/politics/elections/2018/02/16/congressional-candidate-escobar-defends-husband-campaign-immigration-attacks/339463002/ 

___________________________

https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/immigration/2018/06/14/trump-administration-picks-tornillo-tent-site-immigrant-kids/703455002/

Trump administration picks Tornillo as tent city site for immigrant children

About 100 El Pasoans participated in the rally outside the El Paso County Courthouse Thursday.Mark Lambie / El Paso Times, El Paso Times

AUSTIN — Nearly a year after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions visited El Paso and called the border town “ground zero” in the federal government’s war on cartel-related crime, the Trump administration has again zeroed in on the area.

This time the government’s focus is on a quiet town on the outskirts of El Paso County: Tornillo.

https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/immigration/2018/06/14/trump-administration-picks-tornillo-tent-site-immigrant-kids/703455002/

 

Homicide in Mexico 2007-March 2018: Continuing epidemic of militarized hyper-violence

[This article also appears on Small Wars Journal, El Centro Blog: http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/homicide-mexico-2007-march-2018-continuing-epidemic-militarized-hyper-violence ]

Molly Molloy

Mexican crime statistics tend to elicit one of these reactions: 1) Optimistic disbelief: Have not seen anything in the news lately so surely it is getting better; can’t believe those numbers since it cannot possibly be that bad; the Mexican economy is growing, tourism is flourishing; Mexico’s beaches are the best! 2) Pessimistic disbelief: You can never believe the Mexican government statistics; it is actually much worse than what they report; what about the thousands of missing people, secret graves, and crimes never reported? 3) Numbers don’t matter. Mexico has always been corrupt and violent. Build the wall.

The Mexican agency known as the Executive Secretariat of the National System of Public Security (SESNSP, a unit under the Secretariat of Governance or Gobernación, SEGOB, responsible for internal security in Mexico) releases monthly crime statistics available on the internet. The latest SESNSP report was released on April 20, 2018 and covers crimes including homicides, kidnapping, extortion, and human trafficking, among others. The data provided are described as “crimes reported in preliminary investigations initiated under the jurisdiction of the state prosecutors and Attorneys General in the 31 Mexican states.” The most recent release provides information on the numbers of victims of these crimes for the first three months of 2018.[1]

The monthly numbers reported by the SESNSP are considered preliminary in that the data originate in initial police and Public Ministry criminal investigations. However, these statistics have been consistently reported and made available online by this agency for several years and thus generate an internally consistent dataset.[2]

The other main source of statistics on homicides is the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI). INEGI releases homicide data in a more finalized form that becomes available in July of the next year from the period being reported. INEGI homicide data are compiled from death certificates issued by Civil Registries in each state in which a medical examiner has determined the cause of death to be homicide. The latest available cumulative INEGI report was released in July 2017 and reports total homicides from 2007-2016.[3]

While I agree somewhat with the pessimist noted above, the fact that these statistics are imperfect and incomplete does not mean that they are worthless. Crime statistics around the world provide little uniformity, but such numbers are still an essential tool for comparing rates of violence in different countries, regions, and cities around the globe.[4]

The numbers in the table below include official Mexican government homicide statistics from 2007-March 2018, using INEGI figures for 2007-2016, with data from the SESNSP for 2017-March 2018.

Homicides in Mexico, 2007-March 2018

YEAR #Homicides Rate=#/100,000 population
2007* 8,867 8
2008 14,006 13
2009 19,803 18
2010 25,757 23
2011 27,213 24
2012 25,967 22
2013 23,063 19
2014 20,010 17
2015 20,525 17
2016 23,953 20
2017** 29,168 23
TOTAL 2007-2017 238,332  
     
2018***    
Jan     2,549  
Feb     2,389  
Mar     2,729  
SUB-TOTAL 2018     7,667  
     
CUMULATIVE 2007-March 2018 245,999  

 

*INEGI: http://www.inegi.org.mx/saladeprensa/boletines/2017/homicidios/homicidios2017_07.pdf

**SESNSP 2017 reports: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

***SESNSP 2018 reports: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/nueva-metodologia/CNSP-V%C3%ADctimas-2018.pdf

In general, these numbers show a sharp increase in homicides beginning in 2008, rising to a peak in 2011 at the height of the so-called “drug war.” Homicides decreased slightly from 2012-2015 and then began to rise again in 2016. The total of 29,168 victims in 2017 was the highest number of homicides recorded during any year for which these data have been reported. During 2017, an average of 80 people per day were victims of homicide in Mexico. While this raw number is higher than for any other year, the highest murder rate (number of homicides per 100,000 people) was recorded in 2011. The lower murder rate of 23 in 2017 most likely results from population increase since 2011.[5] For the sake of comparison, the United States murder rate in 2016 was 5.3 according to the latest data from the FBI Uniform Crime Reports.[6]

It is important to note that these statistics do not account for the thousands of people reported missing and/or disappeared. The Mexican National Human Rights Commission reported at least 30,000 missing people as of the end of 2016.[7] The official Mexican government missing persons database (also a part of the Mexican Public Security Secretariat under SEGOB) maintains records on more than 34,000 missing or disappeared persons.[8] Families often organize their own informal support groups to search for disappeared relatives in some of the most dangerous regions in Mexico, including Veracruz, Tamaulipas, Guerrero, Michoacan, and Chihuahua. Few people express trust in the Mexican government’s efforts to find people who are reported missing. Indeed, families often report that their missing loved ones were last seen in the custody of police or military. To provide just a few representative examples from tens of thousands of media accounts:

Mexico City, February 2018: “Police detained Marco Antonio near a city bus stop where he was taking pictures of graffiti, a friend who was with him said. The officers accused Marco Antonio of attempted robbery, beat him, handcuffed him, and drove him away in an official vehicle, local media reported.”[9]

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, March 2011: “In March, municipal police officers detained the two brothers of Armida Vazquez and whisked them away in patrol cars. Vazquez and her mother searched for Dante and Juan Carlos, cellphone shop workers in their mid-20s, and checked with the local and federal police here, to no avail. Nineteen days later, the strangled bodies of the brothers were found on the outskirts of this notoriously violent city. Witness testimony and other evidence led to three policemen, now in jail awaiting trial. But the police pushed back. Policemen in civilian clothes, Vazquez says, approached her mother outside church and told her to stop making trouble. When Vazquez made a statement against the suspects last month, she says other policemen and relatives of the officers threatened her outside the courthouse. Terrified, 20 members of the Vazquez family packed their bags and fled across the U.S. border to El Paso, Texas, a short trip into a world of gleaming shopping malls, well-kept highways and safe neighborhoods.”[10]

Ejido Benito Juárez, Chihuahua, December 2009: “The soldiers took them in the night. First they came for Nitza Alvarado Espinoza and Jose Alvarado Herrera. The 31-year-old cousins were sitting in a van outside a family member’s house when troops forced them into a military truck. Minutes later, soldiers arrived at the house of another Alvarado cousin, 18-year-old Rocio Alvarado Reyes. She was carried away screaming at gunpoint in front of her young brothers and baby daughter. It was Dec. 29, 2009 — the last time the cousins were seen alive. Exactly what happened to the working-class family from Ejido Benito Juárez, a dusty town in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, is the subject of a landmark case that will be heard beginning Thursday by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.”[11]

Considering the reality of the unknown number of the disappeared who have been killed, the cumulative Mexican homicide statistics for the 11-year period in the table above (245,999) should be considered the minimum number of victims. Add at least 30,000 disappeared for a possible total of 275,999: more than a quarter of a million violent deaths and/or disappeared people in a little more than a decade—an average of 69 people per day.

If the homicide rate is the measure, Mexico is not the most violent country in the hemisphere, but shares this dark spotlight with other populous countries in the region, now undergoing a crisis of violence. In a new study released on April 26, 2018, the non-governmental Igarapé Institute in Brazil reports: “Latin America suffers 33% of the world’s homicides despite having only 8% of its population. One-quarter of all global homicides are concentrated in four countries – Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela.”[12]

According to data reported by Insight Crime, Venezuela was the most violent country in the region in 2017 with a murder rate of 89 per 100,000. The Observatorio Venezolano de Violencia reported more than 26,000 murders in 2017. Furthermore, El Salvador (60), Jamaica (56), Honduras (43), Brazil (30), and Guatemala (26) all reported murder rates higher than Mexico’s in recent years. There were more than 61,000 murders in Brazil (the most populous country in Latin America) in 2016, and Insight Crime notes that security conditions in Brazil are getting worse. See: https://www.insightcrime.org/news/analysis/2017-homicide-round-up/

For the first three months of 2018, the Mexican SESNSP statistics indicate that an average of 85 people per day are victims of homicide in Mexico. This is an increase over the totals from late in 2017 and continues the upward trend in violence. If these numbers were to continue through all of this year, more than 30,000 people will be murdered in Mexico in 2018. The recent numbers also show that epicenters of violence continue to “hopscotch” around the country. States with the highest numbers of homicide victims according to the new report are:

Mexican States w/ Highest Homicides Jan-March 2018

Guanajuato 741
Guerrero 651
Estado de Mexico 602
Baja California 504
Jalisco 490
Veracruz 434
Chihuahua 433

 

The statistics skeptics mentioned above also include many who criticize the focus on numbers and rather insist that we should focus more on the humanity of the victims. I would argue that it is impossible to fully appreciate the suffering that stems from this societal crisis without accepting and trying to understand the orders of magnitude of the violence. And for that, we need numbers. I will cite just one example of many that can offer a startling comparison: In 2013, the Colombian National Center for Historical Memory published its report on the civil conflict in that country which concluded that at least 220,000 people were killed in the 54+ years of civil conflict between 1958 and 2012.[13]

The violence in Mexico—much of which is attributed to conflicts between organized crime groups and the government’s militarized response—has resulted in at least 240,000 homicides in only 11 years. There are certainly differences in population (current estimates: Colombia 49 million; Mexico 130 million) to consider, as well as differences in the political and social conditions in each country over time, but just considering the raw numbers, Mexico’s recent experience of homicidal violence is startling.[14]

We must also note that the Mexican government during all of this past decade of hyper-violence, has continually stated without evidence that 90 percent of homicide victims are members of drug cartels, thus branding tens of thousands of slaughtered Mexicans as criminals killing each other. More than 95 percent of homicides are never fully investigated by law enforcement. The government never acknowledges that the violence began its steep rise in parallel with President Calderon’s deployment of the Mexican Army into the so-called “drug war,” with support and billions of dollars in military and security aid from the United States.

After ten years of increasing violence and the metastasizing drug gangs, in December 2017, the government passed a new law that further empowers the Mexican military to act domestically against “internal security threats,” thus expanding and providing formal legal authority for the militarization of law enforcement. This same policy and practice in place since 2007 has coincided with the violent intentional homicides and forced disappearances of at least 250,000 people in Mexico.[15]

April 26, 2018

[1] The full report is available here: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/nueva-metodologia/CNSP-V%C3%ADctimas-2018.pdf

The SESNSP statistics are provided in several formats and are now updated each month at this link:

http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/incidencia-delictiva/incidencia-delictiva-victimas-unidades-robadas-nm.php

[2] For example, see: SESNSP Informe de Victimas 2014-2017: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/incidencia-delictiva/incidencia-delictiva-victimas.php

[3] See: http://www.inegi.org.mx/saladeprensa/boletines/2017/homicidios/homicidios2017_07.pdf

[4] See for example: https://www.unodc.org/documents/gsh/pdfs/2014_GLOBAL_HOMICIDE_BOOK_web.pdf

https://www.insightcrime.org/news/analysis/2017-homicide-round-up/

[5] The 2017 population estimate was 129,163,276 according to: http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/mexico-population/

[6] See: https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/tables/table-1

[7] https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-violence/number-of-missing-people-in-mexico-rises-to-30000-by-end-2016-idUSKBN1782XN

[8] The Registro Nacional de Datos de Personas Extraviadas o Desaparecidas (RNPED) http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/rnped/consulta-publica.php

[9] A Stark Reminder of Mexico’s Disappearances Crisis, https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/02/06/stark-reminder-mexicos-disappearances-crisis

[10] Mika Rosenberg, Julian Cardona, Special Report: Federal Forces Sully Mexico’s War on Drugs, December 27, 2011, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-ciudadJuárez-violence/special-report-federal-forces-sully-mexicos-war-on-drugs-idUSTRE7BQ0BN20111227

Also: Staff, El Diario, April 11, 2011, Los mataron el mismo día que los ‘levantaron’
(no longer available on line; saved in author’s archive).

[11] Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times, April 25, 2018, Soldiers took them in the night. Now Mexico’s key drug war strategy is on trial. http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-mexico-disappeared-20180425-story.html

[12]  Tom Phillips, ‘Breathtaking homicidal violence’: Latin America in grip of murder crisis: Region has experienced 2.5 million murders since 2000 and report paints bleak picture of extreme violence and deteriorating security, The Guardian, April 26, 2018

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/26/latin-america-murder-crisis-violence-homicide-report

Igarape Institute, April 26, 2018, Citizen Security in Facts and Figures, https://igarape.org.br/en/citizen-security-in-latin-america-facts-and-figures

[13] AP, Colombian conflict has killed 220,000 in 55 years, commission finds, July 25, 2013,

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/25/colombia-conflict-death-toll-commission; and

Colombian National Center for Historical Memory, Basta Ya! Colombia: Memories of War and Dignity, Bogota, 2016. http://www.centrodememoriahistorica.gov.co/descargas/informes2016/basta-ya-ingles/BASTA-YA-ingles.pdf

[14] Jorge Carrasco Araizaga, De 2007 a 2016 la violencia cobró más de 208 mil vidas, PROCESO, March 4, 2017

https://www.proceso.com.mx/476786/2007-a-2016-la-violencia-cobro-208-mil-vidas

[15] See for example: Jose Olivares, Mexicans fear abuses as new law empowers military—but US security aid keeps coming, The Intercept, March 24, 2018, https://theintercept.com/2018/03/24/mexico-military-funding-trump-congress/

Kate Linthicum, A decade into Mexico’s deadly drug war, lawmakers give the military more power, Los Angeles Times, December 15, 2017, http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-mexico-military-law-20171215-story.html

 

Trump pardoned a perjurer. How about helping a Mexican journalist who told the truth?

Emilio Gutierrez’ asylum case and appeal may actually draw much needed attention to the capricious (better word? wrong, illogical, lazy, badly argued?) nature of the decisions issued by hundreds of immigration judges every day in courts across the US.  Judges who never give any public statements or interviews about their decisions.

[See: 13 years of living dangerously, Mexican journalist Emilio Gutierrez Soto remains detained by ICE ]

Most of these judges’ decisions are never appealed because the asylum seekers have no access to attorneys who can use the law to write a principled argument to challenge the original decisions. Many asylum seekers (like Emilio Gutierrez and his son) spend months or years in prison (what immigration detention looks like and feels like and operates like) waiting for decisions on their cases. Many give up at the prospect of months or years MORE detention (prison) while waiting for a decision on their appeal.  And go back to the places where they were tortured and/or threatened with death. And try to stay alive in hiding.

The president and attorney general of the United States over and over paint immigrants and asylum seekers as criminals who deserve prison and expulsion from the US. These executive pronouncements influence attorneys within the Department of Homeland Security who prosecute asylum seekers in immigration courts. These attorneys seldom have any evidence to actually challenge asylum seekers’ claims under US and international law, but rather, they simply try to portray them as imposters, liars, and fakers. Immigration court contorts the principle of “innocent until proven guilty,” and rather requires that the asylum seeker PROVE that he/she is NOT a liar, in order to prevent the US government from sending them back to the place and situation that terrified them into fleeing and asking for protection in order to save their lives.  Few Americans realize that most asylum seekers have never broken a law anywhere, but have come to the border of the US to ASK for protection from a criminal-political system in a country that uses state authority to persecute them. 

(In homage to Arthur Miller and to the work of the late Charles Bowden):“ATTENTION MUST BE PAID.”
 
molly molloy

Trump pardoned a perjurer. How about helping a Mexican journalist who told the truth?

Kathy Kiely, Opinion contributorPublished 6:00 a.m. ET April 23, 2018

Donald Trump just pardoned a perjurer. How about helping get asylum for an endangered Mexican journalist who reported the truth about corruption?

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(Photo: USA TODAY Network)

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President Trump recently pardoned Lewis “Scooter” Libby, the one-time White House aide convicted of lying to the FBI and trying to obstruct its investigation into the outing of a CIA agent. “Hopefully, this full pardon will help rectify a very sad portion of his life,” Trump said.

To forgive is divine. But while the president is in the mood, he might consider a far more deserving candidate.

For the past four months (at a cost to the taxpayers of some $250 a day), Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials have been holding Emilio Gutierrez Soto and his 24-year-old son, Oscar, in an El Paso, Texas, detention center, despite pleas for their release from the local Catholic bishop and many journalism organizations. One of them, the National Press Club, last year honored Gutiérrez and his fellow journalists in Mexico with its John Aubuchon Press Freedom award.

On Monday, the government is scheduled to respond to a writ of habeas corpus, filed by Rutgers University Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic and supported by 20 press organizations, that aims to free the two men.

READ MORE: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/04/23/donald-trump-should-help-mexican-journalist-emilio-gutierrez-soto-column/540374002/

 

 

 

85 homicide victims per day in Mexico

The SESNSP has just released new homicide statistics for Mexico covering January-March 2018.  Below is screenshot of the summary information. The full report on homicide victims is available at this link:

Screen Shot 2018-04-21 at 15.37.07
The SESNSP statistics are provided in several formats and are updated each month at this link:
The national numbers indicate an average of 85 people per day are victims of homicide in Mexico. This is an increase over the totals from late in 2017 and continues the upward trend in violence. If these numbers were to continue through all of this year, more than 30,000 people will be victims of homicide.
The numbers for “Homicidios dolosos” (intentional homicides) are as follows:
Jan           2,549
Feb          2,389
Mar          2,729
TOTAL    7,667
 
States with the highest numbers of homicides according to this new report covering January-March 2018:
Guanajuato        741
Guerrero            651
Edo. de Mexico  602
Baja California   504
Jalisco               490
Veracruz            434
Chihuahua        433
molly molloy

Mexico to send troops to stem violence after record 25,000 murders…Reuters

I heard this as a lead story in the BBC news headlines last night.  It is especially troubling since a glance at the statistics on homicides for the last 10 years shows sharp increases in murders coinciding with the deployment of the military into the cities and countrysides of Mexico beginning in late 2006 after the election of President Calderon.  I have never seen any evidence that the presence of the Mexican Army and Marines in the so-called “war on drugs” has lead to decreases in violence.

I also note that this article mentions the figure of “25,000 murders” during 2017. Based on the latest data from SESNSP, the total number of murder VICTIMS last year was more than 29,000. Here is a quick explanation of what I think is the issue with these different numbers.
There is a set of statistics from SESNSP that is used by most media and to the best of my knowledge, they report the number of “averiguaciones previas” (basically investigations) for different crimes. That data is reported here and is called Incidencia Delictiva del Fuero Comun
This report has the smaller number. I think that is because what it counts are homicide investigations, basically cases opened up by the different state prosecutors. It does not provide the count of individual victims which can be multiple in one crime investigation.  Here is the actual description from the dataset:

“La incidencia delictiva se refiere a la ocurrencia de presuntos delitos registrados en averiguaciones previas o carpetas de investigación iniciadas, reportadas por las Procuradurías Generales de Justicia y Fiscalías Generales de las 32 entidades federativas, instancias responsables de la veracidad y actualización de los datos.” 

In this report, the total homicide investigations (homicidios dolosos, or intentional homicides) for 2017 are 25,339.

The other report that comes out at the same time is called Informe de Victimas de homicidio, secuestro y extorsion. http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

In this report, the number of victims of homicidio doloso is reported as 29,168.
I think this is the better report to use because the number of victims is more important to know than the number of investigations. A single homicide investigation can have multiple victims and thus I think this report is more useful because what I’m interested in is the death toll from the violence. The SESNSP reports should be taken as preliminary. The INEGI reports generally come out some months later and tend to be different but fairly close to the SESNSP data that come out each month. There are problems with such statistics, but since they have been collected and reported for many years, they can certainly be looked at for comparisons…what trends do they show.  One thing that seems significant this year is how constant the monthly data have been.  No significant drops or increases. Just the steady killing of 2,400 people every month, an average of 80 homicides per day, nationwide.
I posted the numbers with selected data from the report here:

More than 29,000 homicide victims in Mexico in 2017

The Mexican government SESNSP just posted the crime data for December 2017. I use the report entitled: Informe de víctimas de homicidio, secuestro y extorsión 2017

The full report is online here: http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

Below is a quick summary of the homicide data 2007-2017. I attached a file with screen shots from the report. molly

HOMICIDE VICTIMSINMEXICO2007-2017

Summary compiled by Molly Molloy, Latest update January 22, 2018

YEAR #Homicides Rate=#/100,000
2007* 8,867 8
2008 14,006 13
2009 19,803 18
2010 25,757 23
2011 27,213 24
2012 25,967 22
2013 23,063 19
2014 20,010 17
2015 20,525 17
2016 23,953 20
2017 29,168 23**
TOTAL 238,332

The SESNSP REPORTED A TOTAL of 2,575 victims of intentional homicide (homicidios doloso) in December 2017. This brings the total number of homicide victims in 2017 to 29,168. This total represents an average of more than 2,400 victims per month; 80 victims per day. Homicide victims in 2017 surpass the total number of homicide victims (27,213) in 2011, making 2017 the most violent year in recent history in Mexico. The murder rate is the highest since 2011, the slightly lower rate is because of the population increase.

**The murder rate in 2017 is based on the 2016 population estimate for Mexico (via google) of 127.5 million.

If we add the estimate of more than 30,000 people reported missing/disappeared as reported by Mexican government agencies and civic groups, then the number of people killed or disappeared since 2007 is likely greater than 268,000. See:

http://www.univision.com/noticias/desapariciones/una-lista-de-desaparecidos-en-mexico-incluye-por-primera-vez-la-identidad-de-30-000-personas

http://personasdesaparecidas.org.mx/semblanza

Registro Nacional de Datos de Personas Extraviadas o Desaparecidas: https://rnped.segob.gob.mx/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-crime/mexico-enacts-law-to-help-find-thousands-missing-in-gang-violence-idUSKBN1DH07U

*Homicide totals 2007-2016 from INEGI in report released in July 2017. See: http://www.inegi.org.mx/saladeprensa/boletines/2017/homicidios/homicidios2017_07.pdf

**Homicide totals for 2017 from SESNSP:

The latest report covers numbers of victims through December 2017:

http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

The table below provides total homicides reported for the previous four “sexenios” (presidential terms). President Enrique Peña Nieto’s term began in December 2012. Homicides decreased slightly during the first three years of his term, then increased steadily after 2015 (see table above). If the trend continues, EPN’s sexenio (which ends in Dec 2018) will probably be the most violent in terms of total homicides. To more accurately compare these trends over time, it will be necessary to calculate the murder rates (#homicides per 100,000 people) based on the population during each period.

Sexenio Homicides INEGI Homicides per day
Salinas 1989-1994 93,493* 43
Zedillo 1995-2000 80,311 36
Fox 2001-2006 60,162 27
Calderón 2007-2012 121,683 56
Peña Nieto 2013- 2017 116,719** 64

*INEGI homicide data for 1990-1994 plus SINAIS (Sistema Nacional de Informacion de Salud) for 1989.

**2017 data from SESNSP. This figure is an estimate using annual data figures, not monthly.

For an older and more detailed explanation of Mexican homicide statistics during this period of hyperviolence, see:

http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/the-mexican-undead-toward-a-new-history-of-the-%E2%80%9Cdrug-war%E2%80%9D-killing-fields The Mexican Undead: Toward a New History of the “Drug War” Killing Fields

HOMICIDE VICTIMS IN MEXICO 2007- 2017

Summary compiled by Molly Molloy, Latest update January 22, 2018

YEAR #Homicides Rate=#/100,000
2007* 8,867 8
2008 14,006 13
2009 19,803 18
2010 25,757 23
2011 27,213 24
2012 25,967 22
2013 23,063 19
2014 20,010 17
2015 20,525 17
2016 23,953 20
2017 29,168 23**
 TOTAL 238,332  

The SESNSP REPORTED A TOTAL of 2,575 victims of intentional homicide (homicidios doloso) in December 2017. This brings the total number of homicide victims in 2017 to 29,168. This total represents an average of more than 2,400 victims per month; 80 victims per day. Homicide victims in 2017 surpass the total number of homicide victims (27,213) in 2011, making 2017 the most violent year in recent history in Mexico.

**The murder rate in 2017 is based on the 2016 population estimate for Mexico (via google) of 127.5 million.

If we add the estimate of more than 30,000 people reported missing/disappeared as reported by Mexican government agencies and civic groups, then the number of people killed or disappeared since 2007 is likely greater than 268,000. See:

http://www.univision.com/noticias/desapariciones/una-lista-de-desaparecidos-en-mexico-incluye-por-primera-vez-la-identidad-de-30-000-personas

http://personasdesaparecidas.org.mx/semblanza

Registro Nacional de Datos de Personas Extraviadas o Desaparecidas: https://rnped.segob.gob.mx/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-crime/mexico-enacts-law-to-help-find-thousands-missing-in-gang-violence-idUSKBN1DH07U

*Homicide totals 2007-2016 from INEGI in report released in July 2017. See: http://www.inegi.org.mx/saladeprensa/boletines/2017/homicidios/homicidios2017_07.pdf

**Homicide totals for 2017 from SESNSP:

The latest report covers numbers of victims through December 2017:

http://secretariadoejecutivo.gob.mx/docs/pdfs/victimas/Victimas2017_122017.pdf

The table below provides total homicides reported for the previous four “sexenios” (presidential terms). President Enrique Peña Nieto’s term began in December 2012. Homicides decreased slightly during the first three years of his term, then increased steadily after 2015 (see table above). If the trend continues, EPN’s sexenio (which ends in Dec 2018) will probably be the most violent in terms of total homicides. To more accurately compare these trends over time, it will be necessary to calculate the murder rates (#homicides per 100,000 people) based on the population during each period.

Sexenio Homicides INEGI Homicides per day
Salinas 1989-1994 93,493* 43
Zedillo 1995-2000 80,311 36
Fox 2001-2006 60,162 27
Calderón  2007-2012 121,683 56
Peña Nieto 2013- 2017 116,719** 64

*INEGI homicide data for 1990-1994 plus SINAIS (Sistema Nacional de Informacion de Salud) for 1989.

**2017 data from SESNSP. This figure is an estimate using annual data figures, not monthly.

For an older and more detailed explanation of Mexican homicide statistics during this period of hyperviolence, see:

http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/the-mexican-undead-toward-a-new-history-of-the-%E2%80%9Cdrug-war%E2%80%9D-killing-fields     The Mexican Undead: Toward a New History of the “Drug War” Killing Fields

15 killed in Juarez…18 so far in 2018

At least 15 people were killed during Thursday afternoon and evening in Juarez in a series of multiple homicide incidents…  In one of these events, three women were shot to death. One of the victims is reported to be a minor. In all, 18 people have been killed in the first 4 days of 2018. molly

Masacre en Juárez; ejecutan a 13 en dos horas

Racha violenta: matan a 15

Staff/
El Diario de Juárez | Viernes 05 Enero 2018 | 00:01:00 hrs

772 homicides in Juarez in 2017–highest number since 2012

The articles below from El Diario de Juarez summarize the bad news in terms of violence in the city in 2017. There were a total of 88 homicides in December, making the last month the most violent of the year. There were 772 total homicides in 2017–a 43% increase over the number of homicides in 2016.  There are some differences in the numbers that I’ve kept over the years and those published in El Diario. I think this comes from exactly which municipals are included in the counts for each year. A separate article yesterday reported a total of 94 homicides of women in 2017. (Another summary article said 96, so I recorded 95 in my tally). Either number comes out to 12.3 percent of the total victims being women in 2017–this is a significant increase over last year. Still, the average percentage of female homicides (compared to the totals) comes to 9.4 percent from 1993–present.

These numbers will probably be adjusted a few times as generally happens at the end of the year, but the trend will be about the same–significant increases in homicides in Juarez make 2017 the most violent year since 2012. I’ve also posted here the tallies I have, including some variation from those reported in the past two days in El Diario.  molly molloy

Juarez 2017
January 53
February 87
March 68
April 31
May 45
June 83
July 51
August 45
September 74
October 66
November 81
December 88
TOTAL 772
Juarez Homicides by Gender
               Women Total Homicides % female victims
1993 19 123 15
1994 19 234 8
1995 36 294 12
1996 37 253 14
1997 32 260 12
1998 36 242 15
1999 18 176 10
2000 32 250 13
2001 37 247 15
2002 36 276 13
2003 28 205 13
2004 19 202 9
2005 33 207 16
2006 20 253 8
2007 25 320 8
2008 87 1623 6
2009 164 2754 6
2010 304 3622 8
2011 195 2086 9
2012 94 803 12
2013 93 535 17
2014 45 429 10
2015 46 311 15
2016 56 546 10
2017 95 772 12
TOTALS 1606 17023 9.4

Con 88 homicidios, es diciembre el más violento

Luz del Carmen Sosa/
El Diario de Juárez | Martes 02 Enero 2018 | 00:01:00 hrs

Suman 7 mujeres asesinadas en el mes

Staff/
El Diario de Juárez | Domingo 31 Diciembre 2017 | 00:01:00 hrs

Alcanza violencia nivel de hace 5 años

Martín Orquiz/
El Diario de Juárez | Lunes 01 Enero 2018 | 00:01:00 hrs