Sandra Rodríguez Nieto presenta su libro “La fábrica del crimen” en Los Ángeles/Sandra Rodriguez Nieto Presents her Book The Factory of Crime in Los Angeles

El Nuevo Sol periodista, Manuel Morfin escribe sobre la presentación de Sandra Rodríguez Nieto de su libro, “La Fábrica del Crimen”. Puede leer el artículo completo haciendo clic aquí.

“Sandra Rodríguez Nieto, periodista investigativa de Ciudad Juárez, presentó el jueves su libro La fábrica del crimen en la Universidad del Estado de California, Northridge (CSUN) en Los Ángeles, y habló sobre el proceso periodístico que realizó a lo largo de varios años y que culminó en la publicación de su obra, una historia que narra el trágico final de Vicente, un adolescente de Ciudad Juárez que mató a sus padres y hermana con la ayuda de dos de sus amigos y con la firme convicción de que nadie lo notaría…”

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GOOGLE TRANSLATION:

El Nuevo Sol reporter, Manuel Morfin writes about Sandra Rodriguez Nieto’s presentation from her book, “La Fabrica del Crimen.” You can read the full story (in Spanish) by clicking here.

“Sandra Rodriguez Nieto, investigative journalist in Ciudad Juarez, on Thursday introduced her book The Factory of Crime in the California State University, Northridge (CSUN) in Los Angeles, and talked about the journalistic process conducted over several years and culminated in the publication of her work, a story that chronicles the tragic end of Vincent, a teen in Ciudad Juarez that killed his parents and sister with the help of two of his friends and with the firm conviction that no one would notice … “

El Pasoans Take Risks to Keep International Bonds

An article found on the KFox14 website brings to light the necessity for El Pasoans to cross the Juarez border:

EL PASO, Texas — The U.S. Department of State is keeping Ciudad Juarez listed as a specific concern for those who need to cross the border, but many El Pasoans need to keep going.

They go for family and businesses, so they make adjustments and take their chances. For some, the price is high.

The familiar border aroma of onion, cilantro and jalapeno rise in Rosemary’s kitchen in El Paso – the same way they once did in her home in Juarez.

“I still imagine myself cooking, cleaning,” she said.

For 17 years, the El Paso-born American rose at 4 a.m. to make the trek back and forth across the international bridge, and she did it all for a man.

“It just gives me a great sadness because I sacrificed so many things. I sacrificed a lot of things being in Juarez,” Rosemary said. I sacrificed family; I sacrificed friends because I wanted to be with the man that I loved.”

Together, the couple built a house from one room and a thriving little enterprise.

“He built his business starting with nothing but a shovel and a little truck,” she said.

While Rosemary commuted to El Paso for her job, her husband worked seven days a week building their future.

Then, in 2009, cartel violence consumed the city.

“A lot of my husband’s friends who had the same types of businesses had all been killed already,” she said.

Rosemary’s extortion nightmare began and everything about the couple’s future was threatened.

“That put our life, his life, the life of our family in danger,” Rosemary said.

The couple starting handing over $200 a week from his business.

“I begged him and I pleaded with him to move here to El Paso and he refused. He said he was not going to give in to anybody and that he came to this life with nothing, and he was going to leave with nothing,” Rosemary said.

The nightmare went on for a year, and then, the extortionists wanted more.

“The day that he was shot, I was at my job here in El Paso and they told me that they had shot someone inside the business of my husband. It was all over the news,” she said.

In an instant, Rosemary’s husband’s life was over. Her life was over and she knew it. In a matter of hours, with the help of family in El Paso, Rosemary packed up everything she could and moved back home.

American business owners by the dozens would follow suit.

“It was us, it was our neighbors, our neighbor got shut down for a year, and then, our neighbor next to him – they assaulted him twice,” said Luis Gallegos, who owns a staffing company.

In 2009, an extortion threat arrived at the door step of Arias and Associates, Gallegos’ company.

“I got a call in the afternoon, we were right here and they called us that all our employees are locked in,” Gallegos said. “They wouldn’t let them out because the federal police had just gotten executed a just 10 feet from our door.”

Soon after, the Gallegos family would be trapped in a gun battle while stuck in Juarez traffic. Their teenage son witnessed a man shot to death by automatic gun fire.

“We were panicked,” Gallegos said. “We were shocked, but our employees were like, ‘Well, it happened to me when I worked over there at the liquor store.’”

But they were not so cavalier about cartel crime. Their thriving staffing business provided a workforce to some of the 150 “maquiladoras” (factories) in Juarez, and it immediately went into stealth mode.

“The business, everything, is all being handled over the phone,” said Hossana Gallegos, Luis’ wife and business partner.

Luis said that they would not conduct business at night and would avoid staying late in the afternoon.

“If we go, we don’t even call our employees,” Hossana Gallegos said. “We don’t tell them that we are going to be there.”

Hossana and Luis, who are Americans, operate their business in Juarez as though they are phantoms. They are doing as many Americans commuting to Juarez now must do. They drive modest cars and constantly change their routines.

Although security measures are not openly discussed, these business owners say it’s an adjustment being made by all, including maquiladoras.

“You see a lot of increase to the security,” Luis Gallegos said. “They’re shutting streets down. The access to the plants is more difficult.

The Mexican chamber of commerce reports more than 10,000 businesses have shut down since 2009.

It’s unclear how many of those businesses were American-owned, but Mexican business owners by the hundreds have sought refuge relocating to the U.S. side of the border. Most of them move their businesses revenue to the states.

They represent a growing social and professional network that meets at a restaurant on a regular basis.

Statistics from the state department show that there may be no going back to a prosperous pre-cartel Juarez anytime soon.

The state department warnings remain in place in Juarez calling it a specific concern.

The number of non-immigrant visas to the United States has increased steadily since 2009 and continues to rise. State department numbers show Juarez has one of the highest murder rates in Mexico.

Immigration and human rights attorneys representing those seeking asylum in the United States agree that safety remains a rapidly deteriorating concept in Mexico despite what its politicians push to the public.

Meanwhile, Americans trying to run their business with one foot in each country wistfully wish for days past before commuting got crazy.

“I would still commute every day, but it was not the same as before. I would always have to look behind my back. My husband would always be waiting for me as soon as I left for home and would lock the gates as soon as possible,” Rosemary said.

There seems to be no predictability factor as to whether Juarez can ever return to the days before blood began running in the streets.

“I was happy living in Juarez; I had everything I needed around me,” Rosemary said. “I had a Sams, Walmart, and all the stores.”

Those in El Paso creating a booming bi-national community on the border say they are adjusting.

“As soon as you crossed the border, you would see the soldier and then there was one after the other, patrols, the trucks,” Luis Gallegos said. “They would pull you over, and you don’t see that so much anymore. And oddly, you feel safer now.”

As far as the economic impact in El Paso is concerned, given the businesses and business people and families who have moved here from Juarez, every indicator from numbers gathered by the El Paso Regional Economic Development Corporation show that all the stability and growth of the city’s economy is coming from our military base, and not from beyond the border.

For Days and Days

An email from Jose (a former gang-banger) found on the Frontera List Google Groups site:

Molly I wrote to mr houseworth this. We won, yayyyhhhh!. Can you post this? Jose.

From my phone.

—-Forwarded Message—-
From: joeriv…@yahoo.com
To: ghi…@icgpartners.com
Sent: Sat, Nov 10, 2012 10:14 AM CST
Subject: for days and days.

guten morgen, Gordon.
being from that culture i know exactly the mind set of the active participants in this war. (have you noticed that in this theater of war there are no claims to post traumatic stress disorder).and i can also empathize with the unwilling participants. whether they be connected to crime because their relative is a gang-member or as they see themselves “warrior”. armies were invented not for protection but to improve ones own economy. off course the stronger armies have always ruled the world. but here it is something else entirely. these men and women are just more enthusiastic about getting rich. no one does is for the fun, (except the psychos, the really scary ones. i get in their head sometimes and i see the horrors perpetrated on their victims, it is very scary.  the majority do it because of the money and a false sense of pride that what they are doing is for the good of the community. i grew up in those places where if your are a bad kid you are
noticed and a lot of people start to respect you, but is that respect that is out of fear, not for good deeds, although some are considered saints. i was considered a wise guy by everyone and that because i was always the smartest guy in the room. there were smarter wise guys than me but i never let them they were. it was still a mutual respect though we were all tough guys. and we took care of each other. that’s how we grew strong and conquered the texas prison system and then the city of el paso, texas. then juarez and ports unknown. under my direction. not in business but in mentally training an army. not the one you see today. no one killed to get in and no should die to get out. those were my rules. i let soldiers go because they were trying to improve themselves. a couple of them had moms that had the temerity to seek me out and beg that her son be let out. the son was more scared of disappointing me than anything. one of the moms was hot and she
liked me. but i would give the talk. “you cant come back cause you cant be in and out. i going to make sure people help you if you need our help but just to help you along a better way. we all want to find that path but we are on this one. it’s the right path for now. and most of them became better citizens and dads. i am glad and grateful that could help people like this. my people knew that i genuinely cared about them and i and had proved it in the joint and out here, they knew by word of mouth that i was in the business of taking care of business. or as we say “beesnes”.  no one had ever done this. the underworld had a deep respect for me, juarez and el paso and pretty much everywhere i traveled. we respect our criminals if they are daring, a mexican buccaneer if you will. i know how they think. especially the bad guys. i’m grateful i became one of the good guys. i didn’t need followers. i didn’t acolytes, nor servants, soldiers or addicts. most of
these men could’ve been been special forces soldiers. they would all kill for me but i never availed myself of that service. i liked to take care of my brush fires myself. i was good with my hands and feet. i have a street taught black belt. i like to call it street-fu. when i turned fifty i trained for a cage fight in iowa, i fought one whole round with one arm. i dislocated my shoulder with the first punch. it was an anomaly in and otherwise sterling street fighter reputation. i would cross the border into juarez to beat people up. now juarez is very bad mojo for me. after the reporter incident. i didnt go there to hurt him. i went there for these two strippers who were going home with me and my buddy. the guy disrespect the girls and i stabbed him with my buck. anyway, i got beat up but i didn’t tap out. they stopped it. i learned to be humble after that and lose the rest of my arrogance. this runs in the narco’s veins. the good lord deemed fit to
give me a body that i could turn into a weapon. that how i rose to the top of my game in the underworld. deep down inside somewhere in my nether regions, was the me i am today. i needed leaders.all those positive roll models that i looked up to in my formative years who helped me put the jigsaw together that was to be me today. the are all part of the dream that i now live. it was never a nightmare. it’s all just part of the dream that carries us across an untold number of thresh holds till we get it right. they were part of my healing. i am a violent man living in a pacifist’s body. i have dismembered and fantasized about commiting terrible acts on my enemy’s and it’s almost always as an aztec warrior. i just never saw the need. it’s a different story now. when i left, el chapo ruled juarez and we were all the better for it. no one was dying. if you lost a load. too bad. there was more where that came from. carrillo fuentes was in charge in juarez and
all was well. they were recruiting aztecas. they knew who i was and i let my guys work for them. i just wanted my free heroin and cocaine. and if saw someone on the street selling i would shake them down and tell them it’s for tax purposes. the narco’s didn’t’ mind. i was cheap. i never got greedy. thats why i am still alive. i did this one job, (if i tell you, i have to kill-you type of deal). my friend wanted more loot. i told him we had enough, but he went back and never saw him again. alive i mean. i booked it and no one except God and me the wiser. you know something? i am now in better physical shape than i was ever in my gang banging years.

auf weidershein….
jose

Mexican drug cartels ‘operating in the UK, France and Netherlands’ —ICE training the Brits in El Paso…

I suppose it is not really funny, but there is something funny about El
Paso ICE training British secret agents in El Paso… Have they run out of
plots for James Bond movies? As we know, the violence doesn’t follow much,
even across the trickle of the Rio Grande…much less the North Atlantic.
This is an economic system. The criminals (including their interests and
partners inside the governments) know that the money flows best when the
violence stays in Mexico and Central America. molly

Mexican drug cartels ‘operating in the UK, France and Netherlands’

child murdered in Juarez was not sexually assaulted…only one murder yesterday in the city…

The young girl stabbed to death in Juarez on Saturday was born in El Paso.
She and her brother attended elementary school in Juarez. The autopsy
showed that she had not been sexually assaulted as reported earlier.  The
investigation shows that the motive might have been some kind of revenge
against her mother.  The brother and sister were said to have had no school
records when they entered school in Juarez.
Also below, a state investigative policeman was attacked but survived. Only
one person was the victim of homicide yesterday in Juarez.

El Diario

Asesinato de niña apunta a venganza contra su madre

El Diario

Se salva ministerial de atentado; un ejecutado ayer

Arsenal found in local prisons during transfer of prisoners

Federal police in Juarez moved some 297 prisoners with federal charges from
state prisons in the city beginning late last night. In all, more than 1000
prisoners have been transferred in recent months. During the operation to
round up the prisoners, officials found some 40 weapons including rifles,
pistols, and fragmentation grenades. Other contraband included drugs, cell
phones, money and ammunition of various calibres.
I’ve rec’d at least 4 different press releases from the Fiscalia so far
today, but I have not seen anything in the English-language press yet. Some
of the prisoners were flown to other parts of the country and their
relatives are protesting in Juarez.  I expect a better account tomorrow.  m.

El Diario

Encuentran arsenal en Cereso durante traslado de reos

 

remains of 51 women found in Valle de Juarez…investigations in limbo at the Juarez morgue

It is now the last day of February and today in El Diario, the number
of unidentified bodies of women found in the Valle de Juarez is
reported to be 51. I was shocked to see this number since the last
number reported from the recent excavations was 15. At first I thought
it was a mistake, but, the 51 includes the unidentified remains that
have been kept at the Juarez morgue for years, I think going back to
about 1995. But many more remains have been found over the past
several months in excavations in the Valle de Juarez but the reports
are only now being made known to the public.

Another story from Diario says that the team of Argentine forensic
specialists left Juarez without submitting reports on their results
and so the investigations are backlogged and confused and the DNA
testing must be repeated… I read the story quickly, but I do not see
any note of when the Argentines are said to have left. I DO remember a
story from many years ago that the team left in disgust at the
conditions in the Juarez police at the time. I am not sure, but it is
possible that the new Chihuahua state officials are trying to defect
attention from their incompetence by pushing the blame onto the
foreign experts called in years ago. I will see if I can find the
story that I believe was in the Washington Post many years ago.

The body of 15 yr old Jessica Leticia Peña García was buried
yesterday. An account from the funeral is posted below from the
EPTimes.

There is also a new story on the Valle de Juarez, accurately titled
THE DEADLIEST PLACE IN MEXICO by Melissa del Bosque at this link:
http://www.theinvestigativefund.org/investigations/international/1615/the_deadliest_place_in_mexico

molly

Martes 28 de Febrero de 2012
Hay 51 osamentas de mujeres sin identificar; continúan rastreos en elValle de JuárezHay más osamentas halladas en el Valle de Juárez: Fiscalía
Se fueron expertos argentinos sin reportar investigaciones
Woman buries teenage daughter’s remains in Juárez

Remains of 3 missing girls found in Juarez

*The Diario article below has more of the details from the police
reports.*

Remains of 3 missing girls found in Juárez
By Daniel Borunda / El Paso Times
Posted: 02/24/2012 02:30:23 PM MST

Skeletal remains found in the mountains southeast of Juárez have been
identified as those of three teenage girls who had disappeared in
recent years, Chihuahua state prosecutors said.
The skeletal remains were found earlier this month in the Sierra de
San Agustín near the village of Praxedis G. Guerrero, which is across
the border from the Tornillo-Fort Hancock area.
Authorities said the bodies were identified as a 17-year-old girl
(Lizbeth G.) reported missing on April 22, 2009; a 15-year-old girl
(Yesica P.) reported missing in June 1, 2010; and a 15-year-old girl
(Andrea G.) reported missing Aug. 19, 2010. The girls’ last names were
not released.
Officials also said that pieces of clothing found at the scene matched
descriptions given by family members of clothes worn by the girls at
the time of the disappearance.
See more: http://www.elpasotimes.com/newupdated/ci_20038164

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Hallan en San Agustín restos de tres menores desaparecidas aquí
Blanca Elizabeth Carmona
El Diario | 24-02-2012 | 00:03

Tiene Juárez ‘economía de zona en estado de guerra’ dice VP del Colegio de Economistas a El Diario

La economía juarense se mantiene devastada y prácticamente en un estado de zona de guerra, advirtieron especialistas.

Según datos oficiales, cada día de los últimos cuatro años, 44 personas han perdido su empleo en esta ciudad. Además se ha cerrado una empresa diaria y cada 24 horas se dejaron de recibir casi 5 millones de pesos en salarios.

Miguel Ángel Calderón Rodríguez, vicepresidente del Colegio de Economistas de Ciudad Juárez, indicó que los efectos económicos que está sufriendo Juárez son los mismos de una zona de guerra, en donde la economía se distorsiona en un grado que es imposible revertir sin la ayuda del Gobierno.

Click here to read more

 

Chihuahua murder rate higher than Colombia–CIDAC report

Here is a story from the weekend on a report from Centro para la
Investigación y el Desarrollo (CIDAC), entitled: Ocho delitos primero.
The report compares homicide rates and concludes that the rate of
homicide in the state of Chihuahua, approximately 130 per 100,000 far
surpasses the murder rate from Colombia during the worst years of the
violence in that country in the 1990s (about 80 per 100,000). Of
course, the rate in the city of Juarez is even higher than for the
state, currently about 160 per 100,000…down from a high of about 275
in 2010. The study also finds that Chihuahua is one of the Mexican
states which has also seen a huge increase in other high-impact crimes
such as extortion and kidnapping.

The full text of the CIDAC report is available here: Ocho delitos primero

Supera tasa de homicidios del estado a la peor de Colombia