U.S. role at a crossroads in Mexico’s intelligence war on the cartels…Washington Post

I recommend careful reading of this article by Dana Priest of the Washington Post…  A few paragraphs are highlighted. There is also an excellent graphic at the link showing the very small number of Mexican military and police killed since 2006…the number is significant, but not when compared to the 100,000+ civilians killed and the 25,000+ disappeared.

After reading this article, I’m struck by this sub-headline below: Violence deepened ties

I think we should ask: “Did the violence deepen tie (between Mexican and US security forces) OR did the deepened ties increase the violence??

The article confirms many of the operations revealed by the Wikileaks files on Mexico and covered in detail by Narco News Bulletin. The article also describes some detail about the long-standing and extremely close relationship between Mexican security forces (especially CISEN) and the CIA dating back to the 1980s. The information on US drones being used in Mexican security operations is especially interesting and troubling…I highlighted the paragraphs on the lack of effects on the supply and price of heroin, cocaine and other drugs in the US, despite the extremely high number of Mexican deaths. The main thing missing from the article is any hint that there is no information to be able to determine that the dead are indeed cartel criminals. But, we can’t have everything.
Read the article… comments welcome.  molly

 

The Pentagon Seeks to Regain the Initiative in South America–Raul Zibechi

This is worth reading. Note the Plan Colombia $$ being used to train
Mexican and Central American police… Also, this quote from Noam Chomsky
at the end. I don’t always agree with Chomsky, but what he says here seems
to reflect clearly what we see in Mexico and Central America…I would only
add that the “war on drugs” is being used to carry out social cleansing in
Latin America also, not just domestically.
“The war on drugs,” Chomsky says, “is an attempt to control the
democratization of social forces,” because “it is a thin cover for
counterinsurgency abroad” and “at home it functions as … ‘social
cleansing’,” resulting in the mass imprisonment of black youth. Therefore,
he concludes, the “failure” of the war on drugs is “intentional,” since
what it seeks is the destruction of the social fabric by violence, and “to
destroy autonomous economic efforts of diverse communities in the region,
to the benefit of powerful interests.”

Two Mexican generals detained for alleged drug gang ties–Reuters; more…

Note this from the Mexican article that is not included in the Reuters
piece:
___________
Information from investigations carried out by DEA inside the US revealed
that some Mexican army and marines have been collaborating with the Zetas
and the Gulf, Sinaloa and Juarez cartels. The US officer, who asked that
his name and agency not be revealed because he was not authorized to make
statements to the press, said that the premise had always been maintained
that military officers were innocent until proven guilty and in some cases,
they will be seeking extradition to the United States so that they can
collaborate with justice in the US.
Information from the US anti-drug agency indicates that, after a year and a
half of operations in US territory, arrests have been made that have led to
the capture of members of the Zetas, as well as those of La Familia
Michoacana, and the Gulf and Sinaloa cartels inside US territory.

Panetta cites 150,000 deaths from narco-violence in Mexico in trilateral meeting in Toronto

Leon Panetta (US Sec of Defense) met with his counterparts from Mexico and
Canada yesterday in Toronto. A headline story in the Mexican press (EFE
article from El Diario is posted below) says that Panetta cited a report
from Mexican General Galvan Galvan, Sec. of Defense in Mexico, that 150,000
people had been killed in the war on narcotrafficking. He did not specify
the time span.  There are more comments on the press coverage below from
Frontera List member Jim Creechan from Canada.

Just based on homicide statistics reported by the federal police agencies
in Mexico, I would estimate that the number is now about 109,000 homicides
since 2007.  It is impossible to know at this point what numbers the
Mexican military might be citing and for what time period.  Jim provides
more links in his comment from Mexican and international sources.  I also
posted an article on the meeting from the US Dept of Defense webpage. It
has nothing about numbers….

I agree that it will be interesting to see if this number gets picked up in
more media and cited.  It would seem like one of the major media folks in
Mexico City might be able to get their hands on the same report that
Panetta read…  ??  Molly

Panetta Attends Historic Trilateral Defense Meeting

Guerra vs narco en México ha cobrado 150 mil vidas: EU