Book presentation. Elia Hatfield: Por los caminos del norte: relatos de mujeres de la frontera

BOOK PRESENTATION AT NMSU CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND BORDER STUDIES/NASON HOUSE / flyer attached

Tuesday December 10, 6:45-7:30 pm
NMSU Nason House / (University Ave and Espina St., across from FedEx/Kinko’s)

The book will be presented by Prof. Jesus Barquet, with commentary from Prof. Gabriela Moreno, Department of Languages & Linguistics, NMSU. All of the presentations will be in SPANISH. Q&A in English or Spanish. Books will be available for sale. Reception to follow the presentations.

Elia Hatfield: POR LOS CAMINOS DEL NORTE: RELATOS DE MUJERES DE LA FRONTERA

Este libro teje su trama a partir de los relatos de mujeres que intentan cruzar hacia Estados Unidos. Aunque no todas logran su propósito, consiguen levantar su voz para defender lo que perciben como justicia, denunciando lo visible e invisible de una frontera siempre presente en los relatos asociados a la aventura de cruzarla. A través de Ana, los lectores conocerán las historias de algunas mujeres que, al intentar cruzar la frontera norte de México, han quedado varadas en ese lugar liminar representado por Ciudad Juárez, y se convierten en testigos cotidianos, e incluso víctimas, de la violencia y el conflicto del narcotráfico.

Presentador: Dr. Jesús J. Barquet, profesor, NMSU

Comentarista: Dra. Gabriela Moreno, profesora asistente, NMSU

Con esta actividad, CLABS celebra el final del semestre de Invierno 2013.

Place/Lugar: NASON HOUSE (University Ave and Espina St., across from FedEx/Kinko’s).

Day/Día: Martes, 10 de diciembre, 2013 / Tuesday, December 10, 2013.

Time/Hora: 6:45 – 7:30 pm.

El libro estará a la venta.

Entrada gratis y abierta al público de NMSU y la comunidad.

La actividad es en español, pero el público puede expresarse en inglés.

Habrá una recepción al final de la actividad.

elia flyer.pdf

160,000 children of deported Mexican parents under state custody in the US…report

A report from the Institute for Women in Migration (IMUMI) in Mexico reports that some 160.000 children of Mexican parents who have been deported are now in state custody in the US and may be offered for adoption. An article below from La Jornada gives a brief summary. The full report from IMUMI is available at this link:
http://uf.imumi.org/recursos/ahora_hacia_donde_completo.pdf

More from IMUMI here: http://imumi.org/

http://www.jornada.unam.mx/ultimas/2013/12/01/bajo-custodia-oficial-de-eu-cerca-de-160-mil-hijos-de-mexicanos-8740.html

Bajo custodia oficial de EU cerca de 160 mil hijos de mexicanos

Why so many people in Mexico still go missing…Deborah Bonello in Global Post

Deborah Bonello of GLOBAL POST sent this excellent video on the missing in Mexico. The video is about 7 minutes and worth the time.

On Location: Why so many people in Mexico still go missing

By: Deborah Bonello
September 20, 2013 – 12:41am

COAHUILA STATE, Mexico — The federal government says 26,000 people have been reported missing across Mexico since 2006, and yet just two states have a local prosecutor’s office dedicated to the investigation of such cases.

Even there, those who have disappeared are rarely found. Some have been caught up in the drug trade; others forcibly recruited to work for the gangs. Cases of mistaken identity are also common, and some are just in the wrong place at the wrong time. Across the country, very few cases are properly investigated, and reports of the involvement of authorities are frequent.

3rd anniversary of Villas del Salvarcar massacre–EPTimes

Juárez families, neighborhood scarred by 2010 massacre

Parents of the victims and Villa de Salvárcar’s neighbors have said that the massacre was a mistake. They said that there were no members from the AA gang at the party, but that there were players from the CBTIS 128 "Jaguares" Football Juvenile AA League. Five of them survived and two died, according to news archives.

"They were good teenagers. They were students and they liked sports," said Rosario Montalvo, a neighbor who said she knew most of the people at the party.

The massacre left 15 dead, including two children and three adults who were not part of the party.

El Pasoans Take Risks to Keep International Bonds

An article found on the KFox14 website brings to light the necessity for El Pasoans to cross the Juarez border:

EL PASO, Texas — The U.S. Department of State is keeping Ciudad Juarez listed as a specific concern for those who need to cross the border, but many El Pasoans need to keep going.

They go for family and businesses, so they make adjustments and take their chances. For some, the price is high.

The familiar border aroma of onion, cilantro and jalapeno rise in Rosemary’s kitchen in El Paso – the same way they once did in her home in Juarez.

“I still imagine myself cooking, cleaning,” she said.

For 17 years, the El Paso-born American rose at 4 a.m. to make the trek back and forth across the international bridge, and she did it all for a man.

“It just gives me a great sadness because I sacrificed so many things. I sacrificed a lot of things being in Juarez,” Rosemary said. I sacrificed family; I sacrificed friends because I wanted to be with the man that I loved.”

Together, the couple built a house from one room and a thriving little enterprise.

“He built his business starting with nothing but a shovel and a little truck,” she said.

While Rosemary commuted to El Paso for her job, her husband worked seven days a week building their future.

Then, in 2009, cartel violence consumed the city.

“A lot of my husband’s friends who had the same types of businesses had all been killed already,” she said.

Rosemary’s extortion nightmare began and everything about the couple’s future was threatened.

“That put our life, his life, the life of our family in danger,” Rosemary said.

The couple starting handing over $200 a week from his business.

“I begged him and I pleaded with him to move here to El Paso and he refused. He said he was not going to give in to anybody and that he came to this life with nothing, and he was going to leave with nothing,” Rosemary said.

The nightmare went on for a year, and then, the extortionists wanted more.

“The day that he was shot, I was at my job here in El Paso and they told me that they had shot someone inside the business of my husband. It was all over the news,” she said.

In an instant, Rosemary’s husband’s life was over. Her life was over and she knew it. In a matter of hours, with the help of family in El Paso, Rosemary packed up everything she could and moved back home.

American business owners by the dozens would follow suit.

“It was us, it was our neighbors, our neighbor got shut down for a year, and then, our neighbor next to him – they assaulted him twice,” said Luis Gallegos, who owns a staffing company.

In 2009, an extortion threat arrived at the door step of Arias and Associates, Gallegos’ company.

“I got a call in the afternoon, we were right here and they called us that all our employees are locked in,” Gallegos said. “They wouldn’t let them out because the federal police had just gotten executed a just 10 feet from our door.”

Soon after, the Gallegos family would be trapped in a gun battle while stuck in Juarez traffic. Their teenage son witnessed a man shot to death by automatic gun fire.

“We were panicked,” Gallegos said. “We were shocked, but our employees were like, ‘Well, it happened to me when I worked over there at the liquor store.’”

But they were not so cavalier about cartel crime. Their thriving staffing business provided a workforce to some of the 150 “maquiladoras” (factories) in Juarez, and it immediately went into stealth mode.

“The business, everything, is all being handled over the phone,” said Hossana Gallegos, Luis’ wife and business partner.

Luis said that they would not conduct business at night and would avoid staying late in the afternoon.

“If we go, we don’t even call our employees,” Hossana Gallegos said. “We don’t tell them that we are going to be there.”

Hossana and Luis, who are Americans, operate their business in Juarez as though they are phantoms. They are doing as many Americans commuting to Juarez now must do. They drive modest cars and constantly change their routines.

Although security measures are not openly discussed, these business owners say it’s an adjustment being made by all, including maquiladoras.

“You see a lot of increase to the security,” Luis Gallegos said. “They’re shutting streets down. The access to the plants is more difficult.

The Mexican chamber of commerce reports more than 10,000 businesses have shut down since 2009.

It’s unclear how many of those businesses were American-owned, but Mexican business owners by the hundreds have sought refuge relocating to the U.S. side of the border. Most of them move their businesses revenue to the states.

They represent a growing social and professional network that meets at a restaurant on a regular basis.

Statistics from the state department show that there may be no going back to a prosperous pre-cartel Juarez anytime soon.

The state department warnings remain in place in Juarez calling it a specific concern.

The number of non-immigrant visas to the United States has increased steadily since 2009 and continues to rise. State department numbers show Juarez has one of the highest murder rates in Mexico.

Immigration and human rights attorneys representing those seeking asylum in the United States agree that safety remains a rapidly deteriorating concept in Mexico despite what its politicians push to the public.

Meanwhile, Americans trying to run their business with one foot in each country wistfully wish for days past before commuting got crazy.

“I would still commute every day, but it was not the same as before. I would always have to look behind my back. My husband would always be waiting for me as soon as I left for home and would lock the gates as soon as possible,” Rosemary said.

There seems to be no predictability factor as to whether Juarez can ever return to the days before blood began running in the streets.

“I was happy living in Juarez; I had everything I needed around me,” Rosemary said. “I had a Sams, Walmart, and all the stores.”

Those in El Paso creating a booming bi-national community on the border say they are adjusting.

“As soon as you crossed the border, you would see the soldier and then there was one after the other, patrols, the trucks,” Luis Gallegos said. “They would pull you over, and you don’t see that so much anymore. And oddly, you feel safer now.”

As far as the economic impact in El Paso is concerned, given the businesses and business people and families who have moved here from Juarez, every indicator from numbers gathered by the El Paso Regional Economic Development Corporation show that all the stability and growth of the city’s economy is coming from our military base, and not from beyond the border.

Mi Fortuna: Extreme Philanthropy on the Streets of Ciudad Juarez — Tides Foundation

The following is a personal dispatch from a site visit tour by the Angelica
Foundation and its program partners in the spring of 2011. Since then, the
violence in Mexico has spread – exploding in some areas while leaving
others untouched. Social movements throughout the country are gathering
strength, but still face daunting adversaries. This account is intended to
mobilize and inform fellow progressive grant-makers. The Angelica
Foundation’s Mexico Border Fund for Human Rights and Drug Policy Reform is
now entering its second year.

 

Mi Fortuna: Extreme Philanthropy on the Streets of Ciudad Juarez — Tides Foundation

 

9 people killed yesterday in Juarez; 5 are municipal police murdered while off duty

Nine people in all were killed in Juarez yesterday, March 28. Five were
municipal police off duty at a party in a private home. Though the officers
have not yet been identified in El Diario, from the description of a
witness at the scene, it seems that at least 2 or 3 of the victims were
police women. Three other police were seriously injured in the attack.
Earlier in the evening, two brothers, both employed by the municipal water
department, were shot inside their home, apparently while they were eating
supper. Two other people were killed earlier in the day, including a woman
shot and killed at a public park.

On Tuesday, March 27, 4 people were murdered, including 3 men in one
multiple homicide incident.  

I have not tallied the deaths for every day in March—though Diario has
reported several days without homicides, including Monday March 26. The
lastest tally in the news was on March 18 when it was reported that 57
people had been killed so far that month.  I believe the total is now about
80. I will attempt a tally sometime later today.  I assume there will be
more details on the police shooting forthcoming.  Source articles posted
below. molly

Panetta cites 150,000 deaths from narco-violence in Mexico in trilateral meeting in Toronto

Leon Panetta (US Sec of Defense) met with his counterparts from Mexico and
Canada yesterday in Toronto. A headline story in the Mexican press (EFE
article from El Diario is posted below) says that Panetta cited a report
from Mexican General Galvan Galvan, Sec. of Defense in Mexico, that 150,000
people had been killed in the war on narcotrafficking. He did not specify
the time span.  There are more comments on the press coverage below from
Frontera List member Jim Creechan from Canada.

Just based on homicide statistics reported by the federal police agencies
in Mexico, I would estimate that the number is now about 109,000 homicides
since 2007.  It is impossible to know at this point what numbers the
Mexican military might be citing and for what time period.  Jim provides
more links in his comment from Mexican and international sources.  I also
posted an article on the meeting from the US Dept of Defense webpage. It
has nothing about numbers….

I agree that it will be interesting to see if this number gets picked up in
more media and cited.  It would seem like one of the major media folks in
Mexico City might be able to get their hands on the same report that
Panetta read…  ??  Molly

Panetta Attends Historic Trilateral Defense Meeting

Guerra vs narco en México ha cobrado 150 mil vidas: EU