Silent migration to Mexico City–El Universal; Massacre in Torreon rehab center

Very interesting piece on the migration to Mexico City from violent parts
of the country… An adjusted google translation is below… Also, Torreon
is one of the places of migration featured in the article. Last night, a
rehab center in the city was attacked leaving at least 11 dead and many
more injured.  An AFP article on that is also posted below…  molly

{GOOGLE TRANSLATION with some corrections}
Silent migration to Mexico City
Sunday May 27, 2012 Cynthia Sanchez |
The Universal

The door of the plane barely opens and your eyes are full of tears. The
traffic is unbearable. People are rude and lazy. There are kidnappings,
robberies and assaults. Throughout the historic center your bag is likely
to be snatched.Parked cars are stolen off the streets. You are afraid all
the time and it is the worst place to live in this country. Those years and
years of complaints are seldom heard anymore. The Federal District was a
surprise t them. It just was not so bad and today it is the only place in
the country where you don’t have to live with psychosis.

They come here from Ciudad Juarez, Torreon, Tamaulipas, Veracruz,
Monterrey, Sinaloa, San Luis Potosi and other northern cities and find
Mexico City to be a place free of drug violence. It is a silent migration
starring middle-class youth who have moved their businesses or their
studies to Mexico City for fear of dying from a stray bullet or being
mistaken for a member of organized crime or simply because someone felt
like killing them. It is known that one in five residents of Mexico City
was not born here, but there are no statistics on this new migration. But
there are a lot of them and you only have to venture to places of
entertainment such as bars, restaurants, theaters, plazas and even
universities to notice them. Northern accents that echo increasingly in
neighborhoods like Roma, Condesa, Cuauhtemoc, Central and Polanco. Today it
is possible to go to a Condesa bar on a Sunday soccer league final where
the title is disputed between two teams from the north and find the place
full of fans from both teams. Most are newcomers to this city where until
about five years ago they never thought they could live, the same place
they constantly criticized and considered a mess.

Roger, restaurateur, Marcelo, musician, Carlos and Daniel, students–all
belong to a number that no one has yet counted because it is a relatively
recent migration. They are mostly young people who are fleeing the violence
generated by drug trafficking in their places of origin. Students,
musicians, filmmakers, small businesses, young people supported by their
families come to Mexico City just to shelter in place, they say, where it
is still possible to live without psychosis, where they can walk the
streets, enjoy nightlife, go to a soccer stadium, a mall or a massive
concert without fear.

In 2012 alone, statistics from the Universidad Iberoamericana and the
Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)
indicate that students from the campuses of Tijuana, Torreon, Tampico,
Monterrey and Mazatlan have emigrated to the campus of the cities of Center
the country. The Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City received 45
students from Coahuila, Chihuahua, Baja California and Nuevo Leon.

In Tec, the loss of students is a reality, a thousand young people have
left the campus in the north for a place in Queretaro, Puebla and Mexico
City.

Free university

Daniela, 20 and Carlos, 26 are two young people from Veracruz. A couple of
years ago they asked for their transfer to the City because in the port
city of Veracruz they were not free even to walk run or jog along the
shoreline boardwalk in the morning. Even before 2010, Carlos’ family never
would have thought to send him to live in Mexico City. “It was like sending
me to the slaughter, the most insecure place in the country. My mother
would have to call me up every hour to be sure I had not been kidnapped.
Now I live here (in Mexico City) and she feels more secure than when I was
in Veracruz, sleeping in the next room,”he says. Carlos’s parents made the
decision to ask for the university campus change because they saw his
frustration. “The time we could not go to bars let alone not even parties
to the homes of friends and we should stay together in one house all night
until our parents came for us the next day,” he says.

Daniela returned from a semester of study in New Zealand, and after being
back in Veracruz one month, the gunfire and shootouts in the night were so
disturbing, especially compared to the life he had had before leaving.  “I
only lasted one month and asked my parents send me here,” he says. He says
that a week before coming, as he was heading to college, a body was found
on the corner near his home. “That’s what made me decide.”

Restaurants from Torreon to Roma

They started with one coffee shop moe than 10 years ago in the center of
Torreon, Coahuila. Four years after first opening, they had established 27
more across the country, except in the Federal District. At that time they
did not consider it a place they could do business. However, in 2007 Roger
and Marcelo simply had to close their restaurants.”In that year the
nightlife of Torreon collapsed and the straw that broke the camel’s back
was when they disappeared the owner and the wife of our neighbor bar,” says
Roger.”We had deaths of people close, friends, neighbors, and nowhere in
Torreon was peace. People in the City can not imagine how we lived, there
is a collective psychosis. We went outside believing that at any time you
can be killed, so you can not live, “said Marcelo.

Between the two brothers have seen about the migration of about 500 people
from their region. “They are of all kinds, students, filmmakers,
entrepreneurs, musicians, we have all helped, first by helping get people
an apartment and then helping to get work ,” said Marcelo.

Roger says that they have brought Torreon to Mexico City. Groups still
gather for barbeques, but in much smaller spaces without huge gardens and
pools. They have two restaurants in the City in the Roma district. The
concept is red wine and the chef and waiters are also from the north who
came to town for the same reasons.

In the capital city, they say, have found a safe lifestyle. They regained
their social life. Marcelo, who is also a musician, can play at any bar
without fear of someone coming in to kill anyone, and Roger said with
confidence is going to La Merced (market) to buy the supplies for the
restaurant.

“For the size of the city, it did not prove to be as insecure as it is
created in the province. Here we’ve never been assaulted and I think the
hardest thing was getting used to traffic and earthquakes, we feel one of 5
degrees and less than 10 seconds are in the street, you, the ones here,
tell us to take it easy,” he says.

“Here you can even curse at a bad driver in traffic without fear of being
shot because you used your horn. In the north now that would be equivalent
to being able to live in peace.”

Marcelo and Roger hope to return. They have come to the capital city in
passing. They feel a commitment to Torreon, say they and all their friends
who are now taking refuge in the capital are committed to re-build the city
of Torreon and powerful rebirth and creative in business has always been.

Carlos and Daniela want their future children to grow in the state of
Veracruz, the port again want to be confident before.

Mexico: Displacement due to criminal and communal violence via IDMC

In 2011, there were several ongoing situations of internal displacement in Mexico. Possibly the largest but least-acknowledged cause of displacement was violence by drug cartels, which increased after the government sought to quash the cartels by military means from 2007. This violence has displaced tens of thousands of people, mostly in the states of Chihuahua, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León on the northern border with the USA, and also in Durango, Guerrero, Sinaloa and Michoacán.

To read more, visit Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre

Also, visit InSight Crime

Links to Commentary on Wal-Mart’s Alleged Bribery Cover-up

Go to the link for Pan American Post to see the reports in major US papers
highlighted. In contrast to the “cost of doing business in Mexico” yawns
and who cares? Does anyone challenge the basic assumption that Walmart
benefits ordinary people in Mexico or elsewhere? Is it an unquestionable
benefit to provide cheap products made by people paid terrible wages in
China, India, Haiti, El Salvador, Honduras and elsewhere to people in
Mexico (and many in the US also) who have seen domestic manufacturing
destroyed by free trade policies over the past 18 years? Does anyone think
that small business people in Mexico benefit from a rotten system that
requires street vendors and sellers of second hand clothes and other goods
to pay bribes to get a spot in a flea market, or worse, who must pay
protection money to keep from being beat up or killed?  Small businesses in
Juarez now are being destroyed by extortion and the cruelty of the criminal
gangs (often allied with the police) that threaten and carry out threats by
burning and killing. molly

 

Mexico’s Plan to Create a Paramilitary Force–Stratfor

Based on what I know about Mexico and other Latin American countries that
have used paramilitary forces, if this plan gets enacted, we will see even
more extra-judicial killings and the level of impunity will increase (if
that is possible?)… A paramilitary force will have carte blanche to carry
out social cleansing and will be even less accountable than the current
federal police and military forces, in my opinion.  It is interesting to
see this proposal from the PRI candidate since what most people seem to
think he will do is reestablish arreglos (arrangements) with criminal
organizations as a way to lessen the levels of violence.  It is hard to
imagine that these new forces would not be even more easily corruptible.
The term fascist also comes to mind.  molly


The Deadliest Place In Mexico Who’s killing the people of the Juarez Valley?–Melissa del Bosque in the Texas Observer

To reach the deadliest place in Mexico you take Carretera Federal 2, a well-paved stretch of highway that begins at the outskirts of Juarez, east for 50 miles along the Rio Grande, passing through cotton and alfalfa fields until you reach the rural Juarez Valley, said to have the highest murder rate in the country, if not the world.

The Juarez Valley is a narrow corridor of green farmland carved from the Chihuahuan desert along the Rio Grande. Farmers proudly say it was once known for its cotton, which rivaled Egypt’s. But that was before the booming growth of Juarez’s factories in the 1990s left farmers downstream with nothing but foul-smelling sludge to irrigate their fields. After that, the only industry that thrived was drug smuggling. Because of the valley’s sparse population and location along the Rio Grande’s dried up riverbed, a person can easily drive or walk into Texas loaded down with marijuana and cocaine.

For decades, this lucrative smuggling corridor, or “plaza,” was controlled by the Juarez cartel. In 2008, Mexico’s largest, most powerful syndicate—the Sinaloa cartel, run by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman—declared war on the Juarez cartel and moved in to take over the territory. The federal government sent in the military to quell the violence. Instead the murder rate in the state of Chihuahua exploded. The bloodshed in the city of Juarez made international news. It was dubbed the “deadliest city in the world.”

Click here to read more

Tiene Juárez ‘economía de zona en estado de guerra’ dice VP del Colegio de Economistas a El Diario

La economía juarense se mantiene devastada y prácticamente en un estado de zona de guerra, advirtieron especialistas.

Según datos oficiales, cada día de los últimos cuatro años, 44 personas han perdido su empleo en esta ciudad. Además se ha cerrado una empresa diaria y cada 24 horas se dejaron de recibir casi 5 millones de pesos en salarios.

Miguel Ángel Calderón Rodríguez, vicepresidente del Colegio de Economistas de Ciudad Juárez, indicó que los efectos económicos que está sufriendo Juárez son los mismos de una zona de guerra, en donde la economía se distorsiona en un grado que es imposible revertir sin la ayuda del Gobierno.

Click here to read more