ICE Rarely Uses Prosecutorial Discretion to Close Immigration Cases…TRAC

Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse
The use of prosecutorial discretion (PD) by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to close cases in the Immigration Courts continues to be relatively rare — only 6.7 percent of cases were closed on this basis between October 2012 and March 2014. Overall PD usage has hovered in the six to eight percent range for months, though its use varies widely by location.

As of March 31, 2014, Immigration Courts with ICE PD closures in the three to four percent range included those in San Antonio, New York City, Las Vegas and Newark. The Houston, Buffalo and El Paso courts saw even lower levels: less than three percent. On the other hand, the PD closure rate for the Tucson and Seattle courts has been about 30 percent during the past 18 months.

For the complete list documenting the use of PD in each Immigration Court and hearing location, updated with the latest court data through March 2014, see TRAC’s Prosecutorial Discretion tool at:

http://trac.syr.edu/immigration/prosdiscretion/

For ICE PD usage in earlier years, see the TRAC report at:

http://trac.syr.edu/immigration/reports/339/

To keep up with TRAC, follow us on Twitter @tracreports or like us on Facebook:

http://facebook.com/tracreports

TRAC is self-supporting and depends on foundation grants, individual contributions and subscription fees for the funding needed to obtain, analyze and publish the data we collect on the activities of the US Federal government. To help support TRAC’s ongoing efforts, go to:

http://trac.syr.edu/sponsor/

David Burnham and Susan B. Long, co-directors
Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse
Syracuse University
Suite 360, Newhouse II
Syracuse, NY  13244-2100
315-443-3563
tr…@syr.edu
http://trac.syr.edu

He helped capture EU in ‘El Chapo’ ; now his family faces deportation…El Diario de El Paso

A doctor who treated members of the Sinaloa cartel injured in the state of Chihuahua crossed the border to provide crucial information to US federal authorities that led to the capture of “El Mayito” (Mario Núñez Meza) and also to the capture of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera. He was promised protection and reward money for himself and his family, but his wife is now in deportation proceedings and he is also in danger of being deported. If returned to Mexico, they would be in danger because of his work as an informant in the US. Article from El Diario de El Paso.  A google translation is also posted below

He helped capture EU in ‘El Chapo’ ; now his family faces deportation

Luis Chaparro

The Journal | 23:00

A man who was a key witness for the capture of Mario Nuñez Meza , alias “El Mayito ” or ” M-10 ” and Joaquin “El Chapo ” Guzman Loera, now faces deportation to his wife and says that no give more information to U.S. federal authorities , he will be the next to be expelled from the country , along with the other three members of his family, with the risk of being killed in Ciudad Juarez.

According to the evidence shown to The Journal by the informant and corroborated by members of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA ) in charge of his case, ” Alfonso ” – the name acquired as a protected witness the U.S. government – was the one who handed the cell phone using which could be located at “El Chapo ” Guzman in Mazatlan.

” Alfonso ” was until last August attending a doctor at a hospital in Ciudad Juarez to members of the Sinaloa Cartel injured in the state of Chihuahua.

However, he said he decided to do what he thought was right and provide information on the exact location of ” The Mayito ” Guzman Loera course lieutenant , arrested two days after the meeting the informant with U.S. officials .

Now says U.S. authorities have turned their backs and ” Alfonso ” awaiting deportation of his wife, retained in a processing center from Immigration and Customs Enforcement ( ICE acronym ) for seven weeks . If deported , reports ” Alfonso ” , your entire family could be murdered in Ciudad Juárez.

” Alfonso ” maintained relations with several leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel and Juarez who operated in the state of Chihuahua, through their families involved with one of them for 13 years. This relationship gave him direct access to the cell phones, social networking sites and Mario Nuñez Meza and Emma Coronel, the current wife of Joaquin “El Chapo ” Guzman .

Until the end of last August ” Alfonso ” was called to treat the injured Sinaloa Cartel statewide , and even made ​​him the offer to work directly with Hermosillo Guzman writes.

” I began to treat the wounded in a hospital in Juarez and it never died and neither recognized me as a good doctor, why Emma Coronel wanted to take me Hermosillo ” he says.

However, a confession of Núñez Meza in 2013 lit the alerts ” Alfonso ” and he decided to surrender to U.S. authorities , there starting a collaboration with federal agencies in the United States.

” Last July I was asked to be the ‘ M- 10′ to bring a Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez. On the way back he told me that he had come to assemble the ‘ chingazos ‘ again , that was going to be another strong violence because he wanted time to regain control of Ciudad Juárez. This I did not like , I do not want to replace Juarez violent and so I thought it was right to give it , before I started the riot , “says ” Alfonso ” from a location in El Paso, Texas.

It was then called the number of anonymous reporting of the DEA in El Paso to provide information leading to the capture Nuñez Meza . According to his version, supported by documentation in the hands of the Drug Enforcement Administration and stamped on his immigration permit , the first meeting between the agents and ” Alfonso ” occurred on August 18 at the premises of the bridge “Free” around 12 Noon .

” At that meeting people was Interpol , the FBI and the DEA. I told them ‘The Mayito ‘ was in a hotel in Juarez , I gave them the phone he had, because that’s how they find them , the plates of their trucks and everything, “says the protected witness .

Ten days later, on August 28 , Mario Nuñez Meza was arrested by agents of the State Single Police Chihuahua in this hotel located on the Panamericana, ” thanks to a citizen complaint and intelligence work ,” as described by the press release at that time.

That same day around 4 pm ” Alfonso ” along with four members of his family crossed the border under the immigration form I-94 SPBP , delivered to reviewers or ” snitches ” by U.S. authorities .

Delivery of ‘El Chapo ‘

“The officers asked me if I had more information and I said yes , I could give them information on how to find the Chapo ” says ” Alfonso ” .

The doctor says he met Colonel Angelica Ortiz , cousin Emma Coronel, a U.S. citizen married to Guzman Loera .

” She gave me the phone to Emma Coronel, a fixed and a mobile phone, I knew she could find by Chapo and indeed it was ,” says ” Alfonso ” .

The informant showed Diary messages sent to the agent Muñoz cell phone contact with the pair of “El Chapo” . After a phone call to the agent Daniel , case manager , after Muñoz retired a few weeks ago , the version of ” Alfonso ” regarding the information provided was confirmed .

The special agent said not to talk to the reporter , however , be confirmed by agent “Alphonse ” as a protected witness DEA .

According to phone messages and documents submitted in possession of the lawyer ” Alfonso ” , on January 15 the first information to capture “El Chapo” began. 22 of the same month, ” Alfonso ” met with the special agents in charge Saul , Daniel and DEA supervisor John W. Jewett on the premises of the Department of Justice , located on Calle Mesa Hills on the west side El Paso, Texas, to make an official report on the information provided.

Joaquin “El Chapo ” Guzman was captured on 22 February in an apartment complex in the city of Mazatlan , Sinaloa, then the authorities will track the cell phone of the couple who accompanied him up before he was arrested by the Mexican Army , according to U.S. officials who spoke to the Associated Press news agency .

the reward

” Alfonso ” says Special Agent of DEA intelligence “Joe” confirmed the existence of a million dollar reward for information leading to the capture of Guzman. However, note in return gave his wife ‘s arrest by agents of Immigration and that if the judgment did not provide more information about the drug lords ” have no more money, more protection , not more permission to be in the United States. “

” What they did was become a protected informant witness but without pay . The reward is a lie , I never got anything and all I ask is support to get a permit to work here and support my family , “says the man.

But a DEA agent , who asked not to be identified , said in an interview to have delivered more than $ 50,000 in about seven months, ” Alfonso ” by the information provided.

” Yes I have given money to eat , to rent an apartment , but instead of leaving my job in Juarez, risking my family and now we can deport all ; that is not worth $ 50,000 also are to survive five people in the United States , “says the protected witness .

According to the records of the Bureau of Immigration (ICE ) , the wife of ” Alfonso ” was arrested on 26 February and has since been awaiting resolution of his case.

Currently seeking political asylum after he was yesterday the credible fear interview , according to the same unit . ( Luis Chaparro / The Journal)

 

Texas bans shooting immigrants from helicopters

Yes, it is a temptation to laugh at such a headline…if only the shooting hadn’t happened and killed two immigrants (that we know of).  But, Mr. McCraw, the outspoken head of Texas Department of Public Safety says that had nothing to do with his kinder gentler new policy…
A friend just suggested I keep a file of such headlines…NOT THE ONION…. Good idea…  feel free to send more… molly

“While announcing the new policy, Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steve McCraw insisted that the ban on aerial shootings had nothing to do with the October 2012 death of two Guatemalan immigrants, who were gunned down by troopers in helicopter while they were hiding in the back of a speeding pickup truck near La Joya.”

Border communities thrown under the bus by politicians…BNHR response

I am certain that there will be many stories today on the immigration hearings underway in Congress. Instead of that, I’m forwarding this statement from Fernando Garcia, Director of the Border Network for Human Rights and an excellent NPR piece from Sunday featuring interviews with the Mayors of El Paso and Laredo. The gist of the interviews was that the border has never been more secure. This is the same information that the FBI and the DHS and other US officials have insisted on for years now. molly
Border communities thrown under the bus by politicians
Response from the border to today’s immigration hearing in the House

(EL PASO, Texas) —  There was a lot of talk about border security from leaders of both parties at today’s immigration hearing in the House Judiciary Committee. Unfortunately, it was all rhetoric from people who don’t seem to understand the reality of the border.

The usual suspects such as Republicans Rep. Lamar Smith and Rep. Steve King called for “securing the borders,” despite the massive enforcement of the last several years. But we also saw Democrats Rep. John Conyers and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro conceding that “more must be done.”

Worse yet, Republicans specifically fail to recognize what has been done: 22,000 boots on the ground, 6,400 miles of fencing and walls, the deployment of the National Guard and military units, increasing the use of military technology including unmanned drones, and $18 billion spent on immigration enforcement last year alone.

“It’s very interesting to us on the border that the only people talking about border security at today’s hearing were politicians. While the panel experts wanted to talk about solutions, some politicians would rather talk about the boogie man of border security. This shows how out of touch the committee is with the reality of the border,” said Fernando Garcia, executive director of BNHR. “We are living under the massive buildup of enforcement from the last several years on the border. And while these politicians want to talk border security, they seem unwilling and unable to talk about the consequences of it. These consequences include civil and human rights violations in our communities, migrant deaths and families torn apart.”

Border Network welcomes the committee to learn more about the border.

“Rep. Conyers said he would like the committee to visit the border and we think they should come on down and learn the truth before proposing politically-motivated ideas that have real life and death consequences for our community,” said Garcia.

El Pasoans Take Risks to Keep International Bonds

An article found on the KFox14 website brings to light the necessity for El Pasoans to cross the Juarez border:

EL PASO, Texas — The U.S. Department of State is keeping Ciudad Juarez listed as a specific concern for those who need to cross the border, but many El Pasoans need to keep going.

They go for family and businesses, so they make adjustments and take their chances. For some, the price is high.

The familiar border aroma of onion, cilantro and jalapeno rise in Rosemary’s kitchen in El Paso – the same way they once did in her home in Juarez.

“I still imagine myself cooking, cleaning,” she said.

For 17 years, the El Paso-born American rose at 4 a.m. to make the trek back and forth across the international bridge, and she did it all for a man.

“It just gives me a great sadness because I sacrificed so many things. I sacrificed a lot of things being in Juarez,” Rosemary said. I sacrificed family; I sacrificed friends because I wanted to be with the man that I loved.”

Together, the couple built a house from one room and a thriving little enterprise.

“He built his business starting with nothing but a shovel and a little truck,” she said.

While Rosemary commuted to El Paso for her job, her husband worked seven days a week building their future.

Then, in 2009, cartel violence consumed the city.

“A lot of my husband’s friends who had the same types of businesses had all been killed already,” she said.

Rosemary’s extortion nightmare began and everything about the couple’s future was threatened.

“That put our life, his life, the life of our family in danger,” Rosemary said.

The couple starting handing over $200 a week from his business.

“I begged him and I pleaded with him to move here to El Paso and he refused. He said he was not going to give in to anybody and that he came to this life with nothing, and he was going to leave with nothing,” Rosemary said.

The nightmare went on for a year, and then, the extortionists wanted more.

“The day that he was shot, I was at my job here in El Paso and they told me that they had shot someone inside the business of my husband. It was all over the news,” she said.

In an instant, Rosemary’s husband’s life was over. Her life was over and she knew it. In a matter of hours, with the help of family in El Paso, Rosemary packed up everything she could and moved back home.

American business owners by the dozens would follow suit.

“It was us, it was our neighbors, our neighbor got shut down for a year, and then, our neighbor next to him – they assaulted him twice,” said Luis Gallegos, who owns a staffing company.

In 2009, an extortion threat arrived at the door step of Arias and Associates, Gallegos’ company.

“I got a call in the afternoon, we were right here and they called us that all our employees are locked in,” Gallegos said. “They wouldn’t let them out because the federal police had just gotten executed a just 10 feet from our door.”

Soon after, the Gallegos family would be trapped in a gun battle while stuck in Juarez traffic. Their teenage son witnessed a man shot to death by automatic gun fire.

“We were panicked,” Gallegos said. “We were shocked, but our employees were like, ‘Well, it happened to me when I worked over there at the liquor store.’”

But they were not so cavalier about cartel crime. Their thriving staffing business provided a workforce to some of the 150 “maquiladoras” (factories) in Juarez, and it immediately went into stealth mode.

“The business, everything, is all being handled over the phone,” said Hossana Gallegos, Luis’ wife and business partner.

Luis said that they would not conduct business at night and would avoid staying late in the afternoon.

“If we go, we don’t even call our employees,” Hossana Gallegos said. “We don’t tell them that we are going to be there.”

Hossana and Luis, who are Americans, operate their business in Juarez as though they are phantoms. They are doing as many Americans commuting to Juarez now must do. They drive modest cars and constantly change their routines.

Although security measures are not openly discussed, these business owners say it’s an adjustment being made by all, including maquiladoras.

“You see a lot of increase to the security,” Luis Gallegos said. “They’re shutting streets down. The access to the plants is more difficult.

The Mexican chamber of commerce reports more than 10,000 businesses have shut down since 2009.

It’s unclear how many of those businesses were American-owned, but Mexican business owners by the hundreds have sought refuge relocating to the U.S. side of the border. Most of them move their businesses revenue to the states.

They represent a growing social and professional network that meets at a restaurant on a regular basis.

Statistics from the state department show that there may be no going back to a prosperous pre-cartel Juarez anytime soon.

The state department warnings remain in place in Juarez calling it a specific concern.

The number of non-immigrant visas to the United States has increased steadily since 2009 and continues to rise. State department numbers show Juarez has one of the highest murder rates in Mexico.

Immigration and human rights attorneys representing those seeking asylum in the United States agree that safety remains a rapidly deteriorating concept in Mexico despite what its politicians push to the public.

Meanwhile, Americans trying to run their business with one foot in each country wistfully wish for days past before commuting got crazy.

“I would still commute every day, but it was not the same as before. I would always have to look behind my back. My husband would always be waiting for me as soon as I left for home and would lock the gates as soon as possible,” Rosemary said.

There seems to be no predictability factor as to whether Juarez can ever return to the days before blood began running in the streets.

“I was happy living in Juarez; I had everything I needed around me,” Rosemary said. “I had a Sams, Walmart, and all the stores.”

Those in El Paso creating a booming bi-national community on the border say they are adjusting.

“As soon as you crossed the border, you would see the soldier and then there was one after the other, patrols, the trucks,” Luis Gallegos said. “They would pull you over, and you don’t see that so much anymore. And oddly, you feel safer now.”

As far as the economic impact in El Paso is concerned, given the businesses and business people and families who have moved here from Juarez, every indicator from numbers gathered by the El Paso Regional Economic Development Corporation show that all the stability and growth of the city’s economy is coming from our military base, and not from beyond the border.

Rick Perry: US immigration plan doesn’t alter state law…AP

In light of recent stories indicating that President Calderon may join the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin when he leaves office and that he says he rec’d death threats early in his term, it is nice to know that Gov. Perry of Texas is going to do everything in his power to deny legal status to Mexicans (and others) who might qualify for the Obama administration’s deferred deportation program because of their long-term residency in the US…  I assume President Calderon will quailfy for other visa programs. The positive side of this is that he may have to come face-to-face with hundreds or thousands of Mexicans-in-exile who have left their country due to dangers to their lives and who are now seeking asylum in the US. Many of these people are living in Texas.
I guess Gov. Perry does not want to be out-machoed by his counterpart, Janet Brewer of Arizona… It will be interesting to see what New Mexico governor Martinez does in this regard. molly

2 new CRS reports on Mexico

See links below to two new Congressional Research Service Reports (CRS) on
Mexico.  These are generally a good baseline for publicly available,
published information…and the research is fairly objective as noted by
Gordon, who sent me these links.
Word on Frontera List—I’m going to be traveling for the next week to a
conference outside of the US. I may not be able to post things or keep up
on the news. Feel free to post to the list and when I’m able to be online,
I can send your postings.  If you send an article, please also include the
LINK so that readers can go to the source. molly

Mexico’s Drug Trafficking Organizations:
Source and Scope of the Rising Violence

Mexican Migration to the United States:
Policy and Trends

 

Immigration Conference: Immigration Policy and Human Rights: Perspectives from Border Communities

For more information on the NMSU Immigration Conference, see the
website: http://immigration.nmsu.edu/
The conference program is also posted below.
____________________________________________

New Mexico State University will host the conference “Immigration Policy
and Human Rights: Perspectives from Border Communities” June 17-22. The
conference includes keynote speaker Maria Hinojosa of NPR-Latino USA and
PBS-NOW (on June 18), as well as researchers and advocates for the rights
of migrants in Mexico and the US. Free and open to the public.
Spanish/English translation provided.

The lack of immigration reform at the national level has been accompanied
by increasing enforcement measures which directly impact communities in the
US-Mexico border region. This conference focuses on the social impacts of
border enforcement and discusses the challenges facing community
organizations as they seek to promote dialogue and alternative approaches
based on respect for human rights. Panels will include scholars and
community leaders from the US and Mexico with first-hand knowledge of the
current legal and social challenges facing immigrants, border communities
and policy makers. Comparative and historical contexts will also be
discussed in order to understand similarities and differences regarding the
discourses and practices surrounding immigration policy in Mexico and the
United States. The conference will be followed by three community events
with the goals of fostering broader dialogue and new networks for creating
and disseminating new knowledge.

*A keynote speech will be given by award winning journalist and author
Maria Hinojosa entitled, “Stories from the Frontlines: Detention,
Deporation, and the New America” on Monday, June 18 at 7.00 pm. **Click
here to read her bio <http://immigration.nmsu.edu/keynotehinojosa.html>*

Please see program and registration details at http://immigration.nmsu.edu**

Conference Program Details<http://immigration.nmsu.edu/2012-conference-program.html>

- 2012 Immigration Policy Conference Keynote Speaker – Maria Hinojosa<http://immigration.nmsu.edu/keynotehinojosa.html>

- Biographies of Panelists<http://immigration.nmsu.edu/2012-conference-bios.html>

- Conference Sponsors<http://immigration.nmsu.edu/2012-conference-sponsors.html>

- Map of NMSU Campus – Corbett Center <http://g.co/maps/ryz7m>

- Parking Permits for the NMSU Campus<http://ict-iisweb.nmsu.edu/auxadmin/ParkingForms/ePermit.aspx>

Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa to Keynote Immigration Conference

Lucia Carmona <luciavcarm@gmail.com>
Emilio Gutierrez Soto <gutierrez.emi@ymail.com>
Neil Harvey <nhar@nmsu.edu>

*“The Truth Up-Front” **Mexican Journalism: **Silence or Death *
*June 16, 2012, 6:00-8:00 PM*

We would be honored to have you  participate in this event that will precede
the conference “Immigration Policy and Human Rights: perspectives from
border communities” at New Mexico State University, June 18-22.

The forum “The Truth Up-front” and will  include the
Mexican journalists who fled to seek asylum in the United States and other
countries.

Place: Nason House / NMSU BuildingCenter for Latin American Studies1200
University Ave, Las Cruces (directly across from FedEx Kinko’s)
Date: June 16, 2012
Time:  6:00 to 8:00 PM

*“The Truth Up-Front”
*
*Mexican Journalism:*
*Silence or Death
*
*June 16, 2012*

*Topics for discussion:*
· Impunity and Corruption (In Mexico)
· Summary of the process for seeking political asylum
· Legal Aspects
· International Solidarity
· Impact of leaving your country

 

MEXICO UNDER SIEGE Mexico drug war displaces families in Sinaloa highlands–LATimes

Note the blaming the victims:
In an interview, Sinaloa state prosecutor Marco Antonio Higuera sought to
downplay the problem, saying people flee for many reasons. He also seemed
to suggest that the displaced shared at least part of the blame for their
plight because they coexisted and cooperated with traffickers for so many
decades. Mexico drug war displaces families in Sinaloa Highlands

I believe that the level of displacement may be even greater in a shorter
time period than what happened in the Valle de Juarez in 2009-2010, but
there are similarities.
http://www.texasobserver.org/cover-story/the-deadliest-place-in-mexico

The Norwegian Refugee Council report on displaced person can be found at
this link:
http://www.nrc.no/?did=9633486
The section on the Americas starts at about page 55 of the full pdf of the
report.  molly

Insight Crime report on the displaced in the Sierra Madre

 

Silent migration to Mexico City–El Universal; Massacre in Torreon rehab center

Very interesting piece on the migration to Mexico City from violent parts
of the country… An adjusted google translation is below… Also, Torreon
is one of the places of migration featured in the article. Last night, a
rehab center in the city was attacked leaving at least 11 dead and many
more injured.  An AFP article on that is also posted below…  molly

{GOOGLE TRANSLATION with some corrections}
Silent migration to Mexico City
Sunday May 27, 2012 Cynthia Sanchez |
The Universal

The door of the plane barely opens and your eyes are full of tears. The
traffic is unbearable. People are rude and lazy. There are kidnappings,
robberies and assaults. Throughout the historic center your bag is likely
to be snatched.Parked cars are stolen off the streets. You are afraid all
the time and it is the worst place to live in this country. Those years and
years of complaints are seldom heard anymore. The Federal District was a
surprise t them. It just was not so bad and today it is the only place in
the country where you don’t have to live with psychosis.

They come here from Ciudad Juarez, Torreon, Tamaulipas, Veracruz,
Monterrey, Sinaloa, San Luis Potosi and other northern cities and find
Mexico City to be a place free of drug violence. It is a silent migration
starring middle-class youth who have moved their businesses or their
studies to Mexico City for fear of dying from a stray bullet or being
mistaken for a member of organized crime or simply because someone felt
like killing them. It is known that one in five residents of Mexico City
was not born here, but there are no statistics on this new migration. But
there are a lot of them and you only have to venture to places of
entertainment such as bars, restaurants, theaters, plazas and even
universities to notice them. Northern accents that echo increasingly in
neighborhoods like Roma, Condesa, Cuauhtemoc, Central and Polanco. Today it
is possible to go to a Condesa bar on a Sunday soccer league final where
the title is disputed between two teams from the north and find the place
full of fans from both teams. Most are newcomers to this city where until
about five years ago they never thought they could live, the same place
they constantly criticized and considered a mess.

Roger, restaurateur, Marcelo, musician, Carlos and Daniel, students–all
belong to a number that no one has yet counted because it is a relatively
recent migration. They are mostly young people who are fleeing the violence
generated by drug trafficking in their places of origin. Students,
musicians, filmmakers, small businesses, young people supported by their
families come to Mexico City just to shelter in place, they say, where it
is still possible to live without psychosis, where they can walk the
streets, enjoy nightlife, go to a soccer stadium, a mall or a massive
concert without fear.

In 2012 alone, statistics from the Universidad Iberoamericana and the
Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)
indicate that students from the campuses of Tijuana, Torreon, Tampico,
Monterrey and Mazatlan have emigrated to the campus of the cities of Center
the country. The Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City received 45
students from Coahuila, Chihuahua, Baja California and Nuevo Leon.

In Tec, the loss of students is a reality, a thousand young people have
left the campus in the north for a place in Queretaro, Puebla and Mexico
City.

Free university

Daniela, 20 and Carlos, 26 are two young people from Veracruz. A couple of
years ago they asked for their transfer to the City because in the port
city of Veracruz they were not free even to walk run or jog along the
shoreline boardwalk in the morning. Even before 2010, Carlos’ family never
would have thought to send him to live in Mexico City. “It was like sending
me to the slaughter, the most insecure place in the country. My mother
would have to call me up every hour to be sure I had not been kidnapped.
Now I live here (in Mexico City) and she feels more secure than when I was
in Veracruz, sleeping in the next room,”he says. Carlos’s parents made the
decision to ask for the university campus change because they saw his
frustration. “The time we could not go to bars let alone not even parties
to the homes of friends and we should stay together in one house all night
until our parents came for us the next day,” he says.

Daniela returned from a semester of study in New Zealand, and after being
back in Veracruz one month, the gunfire and shootouts in the night were so
disturbing, especially compared to the life he had had before leaving.  “I
only lasted one month and asked my parents send me here,” he says. He says
that a week before coming, as he was heading to college, a body was found
on the corner near his home. “That’s what made me decide.”

Restaurants from Torreon to Roma

They started with one coffee shop moe than 10 years ago in the center of
Torreon, Coahuila. Four years after first opening, they had established 27
more across the country, except in the Federal District. At that time they
did not consider it a place they could do business. However, in 2007 Roger
and Marcelo simply had to close their restaurants.”In that year the
nightlife of Torreon collapsed and the straw that broke the camel’s back
was when they disappeared the owner and the wife of our neighbor bar,” says
Roger.”We had deaths of people close, friends, neighbors, and nowhere in
Torreon was peace. People in the City can not imagine how we lived, there
is a collective psychosis. We went outside believing that at any time you
can be killed, so you can not live, “said Marcelo.

Between the two brothers have seen about the migration of about 500 people
from their region. “They are of all kinds, students, filmmakers,
entrepreneurs, musicians, we have all helped, first by helping get people
an apartment and then helping to get work ,” said Marcelo.

Roger says that they have brought Torreon to Mexico City. Groups still
gather for barbeques, but in much smaller spaces without huge gardens and
pools. They have two restaurants in the City in the Roma district. The
concept is red wine and the chef and waiters are also from the north who
came to town for the same reasons.

In the capital city, they say, have found a safe lifestyle. They regained
their social life. Marcelo, who is also a musician, can play at any bar
without fear of someone coming in to kill anyone, and Roger said with
confidence is going to La Merced (market) to buy the supplies for the
restaurant.

“For the size of the city, it did not prove to be as insecure as it is
created in the province. Here we’ve never been assaulted and I think the
hardest thing was getting used to traffic and earthquakes, we feel one of 5
degrees and less than 10 seconds are in the street, you, the ones here,
tell us to take it easy,” he says.

“Here you can even curse at a bad driver in traffic without fear of being
shot because you used your horn. In the north now that would be equivalent
to being able to live in peace.”

Marcelo and Roger hope to return. They have come to the capital city in
passing. They feel a commitment to Torreon, say they and all their friends
who are now taking refuge in the capital are committed to re-build the city
of Torreon and powerful rebirth and creative in business has always been.

Carlos and Daniela want their future children to grow in the state of
Veracruz, the port again want to be confident before.